Psi

Psi

Web site: psi-im.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: Instant Messengers
Platform: Haiku, Linux, OS X, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++, Qt
First release: July 7, 2001

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Psi – a free instant messaging application designed for the XMPP network. Fast and lightweight, Psi is fully open-source and compatible with Windows, Linux, and macOS.

With Psi’s full Unicode support and localizations, easy file transfers, customizable iconsets, and many other great features, you’ll learn why users around the world are making the switch to free, open instant messaging.

Google Talk, LiveJournal, and Portugal Telecom are just a few of the groups that are actively using the XMPP network around the world — and many other companies and educational institutions are still joining in. Psi allows you to seamlessly chat with anyone connected to this global IM network through services like these.

The project founder is Justin Karneges.

Kadu

Kadu

Web site: gitlab.com/kadu/kadu/wikis/home
Category: Network
Subcategory: Instant Messengers
Platform: BSD, Linux, OS X, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++, Qt
First release: August 2001

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Kadu – an open source Gadu-Gadu and Jabber/XMPP protocol Instant Messenger client for Linux, BSD and Windows.

Kadu is based on the Qt library providing support for various system platforms.
The program offers most of the basic functions of the original Gadu-Gadu program and many additional ones, such as:
– no ads
– support for many protocols
– assigning several networks to one contact (connected conversation history)
– dividing the list of contacts into groups
– multiloging
– sending text messages to all Polish mobile networks
– file transfer (DCC)
– conference calls
– sending and receiving images in the conversation window
– animated emoticons and support for sets for the original Gadu-Gadu
– encrypting connection using OpenSSL
– message encryption using OTR
– notification of events with sound, “balloons”, flashing of the Scroll Lock diode on the keyboard, execution of external commands
– flexible configuration of the program’s appearance, toolbars and advanced configuration of contacts
– advanced configuration of connection to the network (the ability to set the IP address and port of the server, setting the proxy server address)

The first version of Kadu was created in 2001 by Tomasz Jarzynka as a simple KDE API exercise. It started to be a non-official Gadu-Gadu client for Linux and other Unices (and Mac OS X) due to lack of an official client for these platforms.

UFTP

UFTP

Web site: uftp-multicast.sourceforge.net
Category: Network
Subcategory: File Transfer
Platform: BSD, Linux, OS X, Solaris, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL (for non-commercial usage)
Interface: CLI
Programing language:
First release: July 6, 2001

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UFTP – an encrypted multicast file transfer program, designed to securely, reliably, and efficiently transfer files to multiple receivers simultaneously.

This is useful for distributing large files to a large number of receivers, and is especially useful for data distribution over a satellite link (with two way communication), where the inherent delay makes any TCP based communication highly inefficient. The multicast encryption scheme is based on TLS with extensions to allow multiple receivers to share a common key. UFTP also has the capability to communicate over disjoint networks separated by one or more firewalls (NAT traversal) and without full end-to-end multicast capability (multicast tunneling) through the use of a UFTP proxy server. These proxies also provide scalability by aggregating responses from a group of receivers.

UFTP has been used in the production process of The Wall Street Journal to send WSJ pages over satellite to their remote printing plants, and other users have used it to send to over 1000 receivers.

UFTP runs on Solaris, Linux, MacOSX/BSD, and Windows XP/Vista/7. Other UNIX-like operating systems should also work, possibly with minor tweaks.

The project developer is Dennis Bush.

MLDonkey

MLDonkey

Web site: mldonkey.sourceforge.net/Main_Page
Category: Network
Subcategory: Peer2Peer Clients
Platform: Linux, MorphOS, OS X, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Assebbly, C, OCaml
First release: 2001

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MLDonkey – a multi-platform multi-networks peer-to-peer client. Originally, it was the first open-source client to access the eDonkey network. The protocol was reverse-engeneered using an efficient protocol sniffer, Pandora.

MLDonkey runs as back-end server application on many platforms. It can be controlled through a user interface provided by one of many separate front-ends, including a Web interface, telnet interface and over a dozen native client programs.

Supported networks include:
– eDonkey (with Overnet and Kad)
– BitTorrent (with DHT)
– Direct Connect
– HTTP/FTP MLDonkey core runs as a background daemon and provides several control interfaces : telnet, web, and binary protocol for third party GUIs.

Bittorrent-gui

Bittorrent-gui

Web site: www.bittorrent.com
Category: Network
Subcategory: p2p Clients
Platform: Android, Linux, OS X, Windows
License: MIT, EULA
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Python, GTK+
First release: 2001 ?

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Bittorrent-gui – a tool for distributing files. It’s extremely easy to use – downloads are started by clicking on hyperlinks. Whenever more than one person is downloading at once they send pieces of the file(s) to each other, thus relieving the central server’s bandwidth burden. Even with many simultaneous downloads, the upload burden on the central server remains quite small, since each new downloader introduces new upload capacity.

The latest version of the application for Windows, Android and Mac platforms is available under EULA License.
The Linux (older) package is offered via distribution’s repository and is available under MIT License.

LostIRC

LostIRC

Web site: lostirc.sourceforge.net
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC Clients
Platform: BSD, Linux, UNIX-like
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++
First release: 2001 ?

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LostIRC – a simple, yet very useful IRC client. It has features such as tab-autocompletion, multiple server support, automatic joining of servers/channels, logging and DCC sending which should cover the needs of most people. Another goal that the application has in mind, is 100% keyboard controlability. It was written using the gtkmm GUI library.

LostIRC was in its early days, written as an educational project to create and design a medium-sized C++ application. Now, when that goal has been reached, it’s just plain hobby and fun to maintain and enhance the application further.

Main features are:
– Simple and minimal – the client doesn’t try to satisfy the needs of 99% of the globe, this means that the client almost exclusively has “nice” features, compared to many other clients which can be considered bloated to some extent.
– Keyboard controlled – you can use the mouse if you want to, but you are also free to keep your fingers at the keyboard and control everything from there. Sometimes it’s actually faster.
– Tab-completion – both nicks and IRC-commands can be autocompleted when using the TAB key. This can speed up your typing quite a bit, especially if you are talking to people with a complicated or lengthy nick. to /JOIN etc.)
– Multiple server support – The client can in theory connect to an unlimited number of IRC-servers at once. When getting disconnected from a server, LostIRC automatically reconnects and joins the channels that you were previously on.
– Automatic joining of servers and channels – In LostIRC’s preferences, you can setup exactly which servers you want to connect to when starting LostIRC. You can also specify exactly which commands that should be executed on connect, e.g. you could put /JOIN #foo,#bar to join #foo and #bar.
– Logging – Again in Preferences, you can set up LostIRC to log data from your LostIRC sessions to a file.
– DCC SEND support – While this feature hasn’t been perfected yet, LostIRC supports both receiving and sending of files using the DCC protocol.

Currently, LostIRC runs on open source operating systems such as Linux and *BSD, but the code is written with portability in mind, so porting to other operating systems is still an open option for anyone who wants to do it.

The project founder is Morten Brix Pedersen.

ELinks

ELinks

Web site: www.elinks.cz
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: BSD, HP-UX, IRIX, Linux, OS/2, OS X, RISC OS, Solaris, UNIX, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: CLI
Programing language: C
First release: 2001

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ELinks – an advanced and well-established feature-rich text mode web browser. ELinks can render both frames and tables, is highly customizable and can be extended via Lua or Guile scripts. It is quite portable and runs on a variety of platforms. ELinks is an Open Source project covered by the GNU General Public License. It originates from the Links project written by Mikulas Patocka.

The main features are:
– Lots of protocols (local files, finger, http, https, ftp, smb, ipv4, ipv6)
– Authentication (HTTP authentication, Proxy authentication)
– Persistent cookies
– Cute menus and dialogs
– Tabbed browsing
– Support for browser scripting (Perl, Lua, Guile)
– Tables and frames rendering
– Colors
– Background (non-blocking) downloads
– Translated to many languages
– Completion and history in commonly used input dialogs
– Highly configurable through menus and/or human readable text files
– Download resuming support
– Compressed downloads support
– Mimetypes file support for mapping file extensions to content types

Claws Mail

Claws Mail

Web site: www.claws-mail.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: E-mail Clients
Platform: BSD, Cygwin, Linux, OS X, Solaris, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C
First release: May 11, 2001

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Claws Mail – a free and open-source email and news client which is available for Windows and Unix-like operating systems such as Linux, BSD, and Solaris. It has been created in 2001 as a for of Sylpheed with a name of Sylpheed-Claws. It stores mail in the MH mailbox format and also the Mbox mailbox format via a plugin.

Main features are:
– Multiple accounts
– Threaded display
– Filtering
– Mime attachments
– Usenet news reading and posting
– SSL over POP3, SMTP, IMAP4rev1 and NNTP protocols
– GnuPG support (with GPGME)
– User-defined headers
– Colour labels
– Multiple MH folder support
– Mbox import/export
– External editor
– Message queueing and drafting
– Automated mail checking
– Line-wrapping
– Clickable URIs
– Addressbook
– Printing
– Plugin mechanism

Claws Mail functionality can be extended by using plugins, for example:
– Antispam (SpamAssassin, Bogofilter)
– RSS reader
– HTML browsers (Dillo, GtkHtml2, Fancy HTML Viewer)
– System tray icon
– Support for LEDs of some laptops
– Support for the mailbox format,
– Various notification plugins
– Perl filtering
– Extensive organizer (vCalendar)
– TNEF parser enabling reading of app/ms-tnef attachments
– Tool for archiving account folders – IMAP, POP or local – as well as vCalendar (Mail Archiver) folders.

Google Earth

Google Earth

Web site: www.google.com/intl/pl/earth/desktop/
Category: Network
Subcategory: Network Others
Platform: Android, Google Chrome, iOS, Linux, OS X, Windows
License: Freeware, Proprietary
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++
First release: June 11, 2001

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Google Earth – a freeware application which displays a digital globe, and lets you see the planet’s surface using a single composited image from a far distance. It lets you view Earth with a combination of satellite photos, aerial images and Street View. Its powerful search engine, a large amount of information and images available, and its intuitive use make it the best way to discover the planet we live on, but also the sky, the Moon and even Mars.

The images are detailed enough that in most populated areas you can clearly see your house, objects in your yard, and sometimes recognize your car parked along the street. A digital elevation model within Google Earth allows you to view the landscape of many geographic areas in 3D.

Features:
– shows 3D building models in some cities, including photorealistic 3D imagery
– fully integrated Street View into Google Earth which displays 360° panoramic street-level photos of select cities and their surroundings
– allows users to zoom below the surface of the ocean and view the 3D bathymetry
– allows users to view stars and other celestial bodies
– Google Mars – a browser application of Google Earth that is a version of the program for imagery of the planet Mars
– Google Moon – a browser application that allows exploration of the moon
– a flight simulator feature was introduced in 2007, but starting with version 4.3, it was given a labeled option in the menu
– Liquid Galaxy – a cluster of computers running Google Earth creating an immersive experience.

The application is available to download and install on Android, iOS, Linux, OS X, Windows, can be run inside the Google Chrome web browser and is available as a plug in to a few other web browsers.

FileZilla

FileZilla

Web site: filezilla-project.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: File Transfer
Platform: BSD, Linux, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++, wxWidgets
First release: June 22, 2001

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FileZilla – a cross-platform graphical FTP, SFTP, and FTPS file management tool for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, and more. With tons of intuitive tools, FileZilla helps you quickly move files between your computer and Web server. If you plan to use FileZilla regularly, you might like the advanced features like manual configuration and speed limit monitoring.

FileZilla lets you deploy multiple simultaneous connections to speed up file transfers. It has a built-in file management which lets you order transfer tasks via a server list and a transfer queue, and offers multi-language support.

FileZilla is open source software distributed free of charge under the terms of the GNU General Public License.

The project founder is Tim Kosse.