nmh

nmh

Web site: www.nongnu.org/nmh/
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: Linux, UNIX-like
License: Modified BSD
Interface: CLI
Programing language: ?
First release: May 2002 ?
Rating:  star  star  star

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nmh (new MH) – a powerful electronic mail handling system. It was originally based on version 6.8.3 of the MH message system developed by the RAND Corporation and the University of California. It is intended to be a (mostly) compatible drop-in replacement for MH. The MH was originally developed by Bruce S. Borden at RAND Corporation. Then Marshall T. Rose and John L. Romine at the University of California, Irvine, Information and Computer Sciences department maintained it until 1997 when version 6.8.5 was released.

nmh consists of a collection of fairly simple single-purpose programs to send, receive, save, retrieve, and manipulate e-mail messages. Since nmh is a suite rather than a single monolithic program, you may freely intersperse nmh commands with other commands at your shell prompt, or write custom scripts which use these commands in flexible ways.

All versions of nmh prior to 1.0.3 (as well as MH) contained a vulnerability where incoming mail messages with carefully designed MIME headers could cause the mhshow command to execute arbitrary shell code. Though the authors of nmh are not aware of any exploits of this hole, MH users and users of older versions of nmh are strongly encouraged to upgrade to the current version.

Front ends available:
– MH-V is a VI-like interface to mh.
– exmh is a TK-based GUI for mh.
– MH-E is an Emacs interface to mh.

Mailx

Mailx

Web site: heirloom.sourceforge.net/mailx.html
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: BSD, Linux, UNIX-like
License: BSD
Interface: cli
Programing language: ?
First release: 2006 ?
Rating:  star  star

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Mailx – an intelligent mail processing system, which has a command syntax reminiscent of ed with lines replaced by messages. It’s a free implementation of the System V mailx command and features an interface like that by default.

It is based on Berkeley Mail 8.1, is intended to provide the functionality of the POSIX mailx command, and offers extensions for MIME, IMAP, POP3, SMTP, and S/MIME. Mailx provides enhanced features for interactive use, such as caching and disconnected operation for IMAP, message threading, scoring, and filtering. It is also usable as a mail batch language, both for sending and receiving mail.

Some features are:
– Supports the MIME specifications
– Supports IMAP. In combination with either OpenSSL or Mozilla NSS, IMAPS can also be used.
– Supports caching and disconnected operation of IMAP folders.
– Supports POP3 to read messages on a remote server. In combination with OpenSSL or NSS, POP3S can also be used.
– Supports SMTP to send messages directly to a remote server.
– Supports S/MIME for signed and encrypted email (in combination with OpenSSL or NSS).
– In combination with NSS, certificates for S/MIME and SSL/TLS can be shared with Mozilla applications, and can be managed using them.
– Can display message threads and supports operations on them.
– Provides a Bayesian junk mail filter.
– Features a lot of detail improvements over previous implementations of Mail/mailx, such as IMAP-style search methods and flags for any types of folders, killing and scoring of messages, maildir folder support, an option to set the From: address directly, and the generation of References: header fields to avoid annoyances on mailing lists.
– Can be used as a mail batch language in nearly the same way as it is used interactively.

Cleancode eMail

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Web site: github.com/deanproxy/eMail
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: BSD, Linux, OS X, Solaris, UNIX-like
License: GPL
Interface: CLI
Programing language: ?
First release: September 2001
Rating:  star  star

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Cleancode eMail (or eMail, or Encrypted Mail) – a simply, command line SMTP client. eMail is designed that will send email via the command line to remote smtp servers or use ‘sendmail’ internally, and fully interact with GNUPG to encrypt and sign your e-mails.

Some of its features are:
– supports attachments with email
– allows SMTP AUTH
– MIME attachments
– an address book
– encryption of both transport (via TLS) and message (via PGP)
– digital signatures (via PGP)

The project developer is Dean Jones.

ELM

ELM

Web site: www.instinct.org/elm/
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: Linux, UNIX-like
License: BSD
Interface: TUI
Programing language:
First release: 1986
Rating:  star  star

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ELM (Electronic Mail for UNIX) – a console based mail user agent for UNIX.

It contains enhanced MIME and character set support. It can read mail from POP or IMAP folders and can pass mail to the PGP or GPG programs.

It can also view digests as a mailbox and reassemble fragmented (message/partial) messages. It includes modules for TLS/SSL, iconv, and SMTP. It can also view digests as a mailbox and reassemble fragmented (message/partial) messages. It includes modules for TLS/SSL, iconv, and SMTP.

The last version of ELM 2.5.8 was released in 2005.
The project founder is Dave Taylor.
The ELM scrinshot source is Wikipedia; the author is Dave Taylor; License BSD.

Mutt initial interface was based largely on the ELM mail client.

Colloquy

Colloquy

Web site: colloquy.info/
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC Clients
Platform: iOS, OS X
License: GPL, BSD
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Objective-C
First release: 2004
Rating:  star  star  star

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Colloquy – an advanced IRC, SILC & ICB client which aims to fill this void. By adhering to Mac OS X interface conventions, Colloquy has the look and feel of a quality Mac application.

Colloquy supports a variety of different text modifications. One text manipulation supported by Colloquy is the use of colors as used by mIRC; with the primary colors being: White, Black, Navy, Forest, Red, Maroon, Purple, Orange, Yellow, Green, Teal, Cyan, Blue, Magenta, Grey, and Ash. Additionally, Colloquy supports formatting text with underlining, italics, bold, and outline.

Colloquy supports scripting in languages such as AppleScript, F-Script, JavaScript, Objective-C and Python. Colloquy shows changes such as mode changes, ban sets, etc. in a human-readable format, rather than showing raw modes.

The application can be extended with plug-ins, and it also works with AppleScript.

WebPositive

WebPositive

Web site: www.haiku-os.org/docs/userguide/en/applications/webpositive.html
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web Browsers
Platform: Haiku
License: BSD, GPL, MIT
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++
First release: February 2010
Rating:  star  star  star

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WebPositive (or Web+) – the Haiku native web browser. One part of its name is a tip of the hat to BeOS’ simple NetPositive, the other points to its modern foundation: the WebKit. This open source HTML rendering library is at the heart of other mainstream browsers as well, like Safari of Mac OS X and Google’s Chrome. By using the ever evolving WebKit, Web+ will be able to keep up with new web technologies.

Webpositive supports most HTML5 features, including ‘audio’ and ‘video’ support, while geolocation support is still being worked on. WebPositive does not currently support any form of plugins, although developer Stephan Aßmus has suggested that he may look into plugin support in the future.

Download

BitchX

BitchX

Web site: bitchx.sourceforge.net
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC Clients
Platform: BSD, Linux, OS X, Solaris, UNIX-like, Windows
License: BSD
Interface: Ncurses
Programing language: C
First release: May 1994
Rating:  star  star  star

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BitchX – a free software text-based IRC (Internet Relay Chat) client for UNIX-like systems.

BitchX began as a script by Trench and HappyCrappy for the popular UNIX IRC client ircII. Around Christmas of 1994 the script was patched directly into the client by Colten Edwards (panasync).

As BitchX was developed over the years it both developed its own large set of unique features, as well as acquiring many features from EPIC (another popular ircII offshoot).

Features:
– Works out-of-the box.
– Fully configurable and themable.
– Extended ircII scripting functionality.
– Built-in bot-like channel management functionality.
– Built-in mass commands and tools.
– Extended set of DCC commands and built-in CDCC/XDCC file offering.

Qutebrowser

Qutebrowser

Web site: qutebrowser.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web Browsers
Platform: BSD, Linux, OS X, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Python
First release: December 14, 2014
Rating:  star  star  star

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Qutebrowser – a keyboard-focused browser with a minimal GUI. It’s based on Python and PyQt5 and free software, licensed under the GPL. It was inspired by other browsers/addons like dwb and Vimperator/Pentadactyl.

Qutebrowser can be configured via the UI, the qutebrowser command-line or a Python script. It supports two different rendering engine backends: QtWebKit and QtWebEngine. Qutebrowser optionally uses pdf.js to display PDF files in the browser.

Qutebrowser’s primary author is Florian Bruhin (The Compiler).

Snownews

Snownews

Web site: github.com/kouya/snownews
Category: Network
Subcategory: RSS Readers
Platform: BSD, Cygwin, Linux, OS X, Solaris, UNIX-like
License: GPL
Interface: Ncurses
Programing language: ?
First release: 2004 ?
Rating:  star  star

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Snownews – a command-line RSS feed reader. It is designed to be simple and lightweight, and integrates well with other command-line tools, for both generating and filtering the feeds it reads. Snownews runs on almost anything Unix (and will even build with Cygwin).

Features:
– Runs on Linux, BSD, OS X (Darwin), Solaris and probably many more Unices. Yes, even works under Cygwin
– Fast and very resource friendly
– Builtin HTTP client will follow server redirects and update feed URLs that point to permanent redirects (301) automatically
– Understands “Not-Modified” (304) server replies and handles gzip compression
– Uses local cache for minimal network traffic
– Supports HTTP proxy
– Supports HTTP authentication (basic and digest methods)
– Supports cookies
– A help menu available throughout the program
– Few dependencies on external libraries; ncurses and libxml2
– Import feature for OPML subscription lists
– Fully customizable key bindings of all program functions
– Type Ahead Find for quick and easy navigation
– Color support
– Extensible via plugins
– Feed categories and many other useful features

Main program code and maintainer is Oliver Feiler.
The latest version of Snownews 1.5.12 was released in 2009.

Qataki

Qataki

Web site: chr.tx0.org/qataki
Category: Network
Subcategory: Microblog Clients
Platform: BSD, Linux, UNIX-like
License: The Unlicense
Interface: CLI
Programing language: ?
First release: May 9, 2010
Rating:  star  star

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Qataki – a command line (CLI) gs.sdf.org/StatusNet/Twitter client.

It’s a shell script that you can use to read/post notices from the command line in a simple manner. Besides that, with qataki you can: reply to posts; retweet notices; search for notices. As you can see there are not fancy features. However, if you feel that something useful lacks, contact me (@chr, gs.sdf.org) or play yourself with the code.

By default gs.sdf.org and Twitter support is enabled. You can use a StatusNet site by creating an alias in a configuration file.

Please note: Twitter used to work some time ago. Currently it is not supported.