Resilio Sync

Resilio Sync

Web site: www.resilio.com
Category: Network
Subcategory: File Backup and Sync
Platform: Android, BSD, iOS, Linux, OS X, Windows
License: Freemium
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Unknown
First release: 2016
Rating:  star  star  star  star

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Resilio Sync – a fast, reliable, and simple file sync and share solution, powered by P2P technology.

Features:
– Sync any folder to all your devices. Sync photos, videos, music, PDFs, docs or any other file types to/from your mobile phone, laptop, or NAS
– The fastest and most private way to send files to friends and family. Send one or more files to multiple recipients without sharing the whole folder or creating a permanent sync connection
– Change access permissions at any time using ‘Advanced Folders’. Assign ownership to another user, revoke access, or change read and write permissions on the fly.
– Using ‘Selective Sync’ feature, Sync will create placeholder files in your file-system that can be searched locally.
– You can set bandwidth usage limits so Sync activity occurs only when it suits you.
– Backup your files automatically to another device you own. Create your own Disaster Recovery site.
– Keep folders synced between multiple platforms and operating systems. Sync is available for OS X, Windows, Linux, iOS, Android, all major NAS devices, and more.

In early 2016, Resilio Inc. was spun out of BitTorrent Inc. to bring the power and resilience of distributed technology to the modern enterprise. Resilio started with core BitTorrent technology and hardened it for commercial use while adding the centralized management and control required for modern IT.

The project has been founded by Konstantin Lissounov.

Syncthing

Syncthing

Web site: syncthing.net
Category: Network
Subcategory: File Backup and Sync
Platform: Android, BSD, Linux, Solaris, OS X, Windows
License: MPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Go
First release: December 2013
Rating:  star  star  star  star

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Syncthing – a continuous file synchronization program. It synchronizes files between two or more computers.

Features:
– Private. None of your data is ever stored anywhere else other than on your computers. There is no central server that might be compromised, legally or illegally.
– Encrypted. All communication is secured using TLS. The encryption used includes perfect forward secrecy to prevent any eavesdropper from ever gaining access to your data.
– Authenticated. Every node is identified by a strong cryptographic certificate. Only nodes you have explicitly allowed can connect to your cluster.
– Web GUI. Configure and monitor Syncthing via a responsive and powerful interface accessible via your browser.
– Portable. Works on Mac OS X, Windows, Linux, FreeBSD, Solaris and OpenBSD. Run it on your desktop computers and synchronize them with your server for backup.
– Simple. Syncthing doesn’t need IP addresses or advanced configuration: it just works, over LAN and over the Internet. Every machine is identified by an ID. Just give your ID to your friends, share a folder and watch: UPnP will do if you don’t want to port forward or you don’t know how.
– Powerful. Synchronize as many folders as you need with different people.

The project founder is Jakob Borg.

rsync

rsync

Web site: rsync.samba.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: File Backup and Sync
Platform: BSD, Linux, OS X, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: text
Programing language: C
First release: June 19, 1996
Rating:  star  star  star  star  star

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rsync – an open source utility that provides fast incremental file transfer.

rsync uses the “rsync algorithm” which provides a very fast method for bringing remote files into sync. It does this by sending just the differences in the files across the link, without requiring that both sets of files are present at one of the ends of the link beforehand.

It can copy locally, to/from another host over any remote shell, or to/from a remote rsync daemon. It offers a large number of options that control every aspect of its behavior and permit very flexible specification of the set of files to be copied. It is famous for its delta-transfer algorithm, which reduces the amount of data sent over the network by sending only the differences between the source files and the existing files in the destination. Rsync is widely used for backups and mirroring and as an improved copy command for everyday use.

Some features of rsync:
– can update whole directory trees and filesystems
– optionally preserves symbolic links, hard links, file ownership, permissions, devices and times
– requires no special privileges to install
– internal pipelining reduces latency for multiple files
– can use rsh, ssh or direct sockets as the transport
– supports anonymous rsync which is ideal for mirroring

rsync was originally written by Andrew Tridgell and Paul Mackerras.

luckyBackup

luckyBackup

Web site: luckybackup.sourceforge.net
Category: Network
Subcategory: File Backup and Sync
Platform: BSD, Linux, OS X, OS/2, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++
First release: 2008
Rating:  star  star  star  star

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luckyBackup – an application that backs-up and/or synchronizes any directories with the power of rsync. Its main features are: backup, safety, synchronization, exclude/only include options, allows custom rsync options, remote connections, restore and dry-run operations, scheduling, profiles and command line mode.

It is simple to use, fast (transfers over only changes made and not all data), safe (keeps your data safe by checking all declared directories before proceeding in any data manipulation ), reliable and fully customizable.

Main features:
– Creates multiple backup “snapshots”
– Sync any directories keeping the files that were most recently modified on both of them
– Checks whether the directories you’ve declared exist or if they are empty and warns you accordingly
– Exclude any file, folder or pattern from the transfer
– Add/remove any rsync option
– Remote connections are possible, either for use as a source or as a destination
– You can execute any command(s) before or after a specific task
– Perform a trial run that doesn’t make any changes (and produces mostly the same output as a real run)
– A separate check-box can be used to include or not the operations within a profile
– You can save your preferences in a .profile file and load it whenever needed
– Scheduling for execution of already created profiles via cronjobs is supported

The project developer is Loukas Avgeriou.

nmh

nmh

Web site: www.nongnu.org/nmh/
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: Linux, UNIX-like
License: Modified BSD
Interface: CLI
Programing language: ?
First release: May 2002 ?
Rating:  star  star  star

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nmh (new MH) – a powerful electronic mail handling system. It was originally based on version 6.8.3 of the MH message system developed by the RAND Corporation and the University of California. It is intended to be a (mostly) compatible drop-in replacement for MH. The MH was originally developed by Bruce S. Borden at RAND Corporation. Then Marshall T. Rose and John L. Romine at the University of California, Irvine, Information and Computer Sciences department maintained it until 1997 when version 6.8.5 was released.

nmh consists of a collection of fairly simple single-purpose programs to send, receive, save, retrieve, and manipulate e-mail messages. Since nmh is a suite rather than a single monolithic program, you may freely intersperse nmh commands with other commands at your shell prompt, or write custom scripts which use these commands in flexible ways.

All versions of nmh prior to 1.0.3 (as well as MH) contained a vulnerability where incoming mail messages with carefully designed MIME headers could cause the mhshow command to execute arbitrary shell code. Though the authors of nmh are not aware of any exploits of this hole, MH users and users of older versions of nmh are strongly encouraged to upgrade to the current version.

Front ends available:
– MH-V is a VI-like interface to mh.
– exmh is a TK-based GUI for mh.
– MH-E is an Emacs interface to mh.

Mailx

Mailx

Web site: heirloom.sourceforge.net/mailx.html
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: BSD, Linux, UNIX-like
License: BSD
Interface: cli
Programing language: ?
First release: 2006 ?
Rating:  star  star

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Mailx – an intelligent mail processing system, which has a command syntax reminiscent of ed with lines replaced by messages. It’s a free implementation of the System V mailx command and features an interface like that by default.

It is based on Berkeley Mail 8.1, is intended to provide the functionality of the POSIX mailx command, and offers extensions for MIME, IMAP, POP3, SMTP, and S/MIME. Mailx provides enhanced features for interactive use, such as caching and disconnected operation for IMAP, message threading, scoring, and filtering. It is also usable as a mail batch language, both for sending and receiving mail.

Some features are:
– Supports the MIME specifications
– Supports IMAP. In combination with either OpenSSL or Mozilla NSS, IMAPS can also be used.
– Supports caching and disconnected operation of IMAP folders.
– Supports POP3 to read messages on a remote server. In combination with OpenSSL or NSS, POP3S can also be used.
– Supports SMTP to send messages directly to a remote server.
– Supports S/MIME for signed and encrypted email (in combination with OpenSSL or NSS).
– In combination with NSS, certificates for S/MIME and SSL/TLS can be shared with Mozilla applications, and can be managed using them.
– Can display message threads and supports operations on them.
– Provides a Bayesian junk mail filter.
– Features a lot of detail improvements over previous implementations of Mail/mailx, such as IMAP-style search methods and flags for any types of folders, killing and scoring of messages, maildir folder support, an option to set the From: address directly, and the generation of References: header fields to avoid annoyances on mailing lists.
– Can be used as a mail batch language in nearly the same way as it is used interactively.

Cleancode eMail

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Web site: github.com/deanproxy/eMail
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: BSD, Linux, OS X, Solaris, UNIX-like
License: GPL
Interface: CLI
Programing language: ?
First release: September 2001
Rating:  star  star

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Cleancode eMail (or eMail, or Encrypted Mail) – a simply, command line SMTP client. eMail is designed that will send email via the command line to remote smtp servers or use ‘sendmail’ internally, and fully interact with GNUPG to encrypt and sign your e-mails.

Some of its features are:
– supports attachments with email
– allows SMTP AUTH
– MIME attachments
– an address book
– encryption of both transport (via TLS) and message (via PGP)
– digital signatures (via PGP)

The project developer is Dean Jones.

ELM

ELM

Web site: www.instinct.org/elm/
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: Linux, UNIX-like
License: BSD
Interface: TUI
Programing language:
First release: 1986
Rating:  star  star

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ELM (Electronic Mail for UNIX) – a console based mail user agent for UNIX.

It contains enhanced MIME and character set support. It can read mail from POP or IMAP folders and can pass mail to the PGP or GPG programs.

It can also view digests as a mailbox and reassemble fragmented (message/partial) messages. It includes modules for TLS/SSL, iconv, and SMTP. It can also view digests as a mailbox and reassemble fragmented (message/partial) messages. It includes modules for TLS/SSL, iconv, and SMTP.

The last version of ELM 2.5.8 was released in 2005.
The project founder is Dave Taylor.
The ELM scrinshot source is Wikipedia; the author is Dave Taylor; License BSD.

Mutt initial interface was based largely on the ELM mail client.

Colloquy

Colloquy

Web site: colloquy.info/
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC Clients
Platform: iOS, OS X
License: GPL, BSD
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Objective-C
First release: 2004
Rating:  star  star  star

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Colloquy – an advanced IRC, SILC & ICB client which aims to fill this void. By adhering to Mac OS X interface conventions, Colloquy has the look and feel of a quality Mac application.

Colloquy supports a variety of different text modifications. One text manipulation supported by Colloquy is the use of colors as used by mIRC; with the primary colors being: White, Black, Navy, Forest, Red, Maroon, Purple, Orange, Yellow, Green, Teal, Cyan, Blue, Magenta, Grey, and Ash. Additionally, Colloquy supports formatting text with underlining, italics, bold, and outline.

Colloquy supports scripting in languages such as AppleScript, F-Script, JavaScript, Objective-C and Python. Colloquy shows changes such as mode changes, ban sets, etc. in a human-readable format, rather than showing raw modes.

The application can be extended with plug-ins, and it also works with AppleScript.

WebPositive

WebPositive

Web site: www.haiku-os.org/docs/userguide/en/applications/webpositive.html
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web Browsers
Platform: Haiku
License: BSD, GPL, MIT
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++
First release: February 2010
Rating:  star  star  star

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WebPositive (or Web+) – the Haiku native web browser. One part of its name is a tip of the hat to BeOS’ simple NetPositive, the other points to its modern foundation: the WebKit. This open source HTML rendering library is at the heart of other mainstream browsers as well, like Safari of Mac OS X and Google’s Chrome. By using the ever evolving WebKit, Web+ will be able to keep up with new web technologies.

Webpositive supports most HTML5 features, including ‘audio’ and ‘video’ support, while geolocation support is still being worked on. WebPositive does not currently support any form of plugins, although developer Stephan Aßmus has suggested that he may look into plugin support in the future.

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