Midori

Midori

Web site: midori-browser.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: Linux, Windows, Portable
License: LGPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C, Vala
First release: December 16, 2007

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Midori – a lightweight, fast, and free web browser. It aligns well with the Xfce philosophy of making the most out of available resources. It uses the WebKit rendering engine and the GTK+ 2 or GTK+ 3 interface.

Features:
– lightweight and super-fast
– simple, easy to use, big-button interface makes Midori not only easy to use, but also leaves more space for the site you want to see
– bookmarks support
– RSS, Atom, and XML Feeds support
– spell checker built-in
– built-in file downloader
– tabs, windows and session management
– DuckDuckGo as a default search engine
– extensions support
– private browsing
– user scripts support
– customizable keyboard interface

The project developers are Christian Dywan and Nancy Runge.

w3m

w3m

Web site: w3m.sourceforge.net
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: BSD, Linux, OS/2, UNIX-like, Windows
License: MIT
Interface: CLI
Programing language: C
First release: 1995
Status: Not Active

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w3m – a text-based web browser as well as a pager like `more’ or `less’. With w3m you can browse web pages through a terminal emulator window (xterm, rxvt or something like that). Moreover, w3m can be used as a text formatting tool which typesets HTML into plain text.

It supports tables, frames, cookies, authentication, SSL connections, color and inline images on suitable terminals, and almost everything except JavaScript. It can also be used with mouse in an xterm or in a gpm-driven console.

The project was under development by Akinori Ito and team members.

TOR

TOR

Web site: www.torproject.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: Network Others
Platform: Android, Linux, OS X, UNIX-like, Windows
License: BSD
Interface: none
Programing language: C, Python, Rust
First release: September 20, 2002

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TOR (The Onion Router) – a free software and an open network that helps you defend against traffic analysis, a form of network surveillance that threatens personal freedom and privacy, confidential business activities and relationships, and state security.

The Tor network is a group of volunteer-operated servers that allows people to improve their privacy and security on the Internet. Tor’s users employ this network by connecting through a series of virtual tunnels rather than making a direct connection, thus allowing both organizations and individuals to share information over public networks without compromising their privacy.

Tor is an effective censorship circumvention tool, allowing its users to reach otherwise blocked destinations or content. Tor can also be used as a building block for software developers to create new communication tools with built-in privacy features.

Client applications can use the Tor network by connecting to the local socks proxy interface provided by your Tor instance. If the application itself does not come with socks support, you can use a socks client such as torsocks.

TOR project offers the TOR Browser, a ready to use web browser based on Firefox with TOR application built-in.

Google Earth

Google Earth

Web site: www.google.com/intl/pl/earth/desktop/
Category: Network
Subcategory: Network Others
Platform: Android, Google Chrome, iOS, Linux, OS X, Windows
License: Freeware, Proprietary
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++
First release: June 11, 2001

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Google Earth – a freeware application which displays a digital globe, and lets you see the planet’s surface using a single composited image from a far distance. It lets you view Earth with a combination of satellite photos, aerial images and Street View. Its powerful search engine, a large amount of information and images available, and its intuitive use make it the best way to discover the planet we live on, but also the sky, the Moon and even Mars.

The images are detailed enough that in most populated areas you can clearly see your house, objects in your yard, and sometimes recognize your car parked along the street. A digital elevation model within Google Earth allows you to view the landscape of many geographic areas in 3D.

Features:
– shows 3D building models in some cities, including photorealistic 3D imagery
– fully integrated Street View into Google Earth which displays 360° panoramic street-level photos of select cities and their surroundings
– allows users to zoom below the surface of the ocean and view the 3D bathymetry
– allows users to view stars and other celestial bodies
– Google Mars – a browser application of Google Earth that is a version of the program for imagery of the planet Mars
– Google Moon – a browser application that allows exploration of the moon
– a flight simulator feature was introduced in 2007, but starting with version 4.3, it was given a labeled option in the menu
– Liquid Galaxy – a cluster of computers running Google Earth creating an immersive experience.

The application is available to download and install on Android, iOS, Linux, OS X, Windows, can be run inside the Google Chrome web browser and is available as a plug in to a few other web browsers.

FileZilla

FileZilla

Web site: filezilla-project.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: File Transfer
Platform: BSD, Linux, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++, wxWidgets
First release: June 22, 2001

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FileZilla – a cross-platform graphical FTP, SFTP, and FTPS file management tool for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, and more. With tons of intuitive tools, FileZilla helps you quickly move files between your computer and Web server. If you plan to use FileZilla regularly, you might like the advanced features like manual configuration and speed limit monitoring.

FileZilla lets you deploy multiple simultaneous connections to speed up file transfers. It has a built-in file management which lets you order transfer tasks via a server list and a transfer queue, and offers multi-language support.

FileZilla is open source software distributed free of charge under the terms of the GNU General Public License.

The project founder is Tim Kosse.

Trojitá

Trojitá

Web site: trojita.flaska.net
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: Linux, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++, Qt
First release: August 31, 2009

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Trojitá – a fast Qt IMAP e-mail client.

The main features of the applications are:
– enables you to access your mail anytime, anywhere
– does not slow you down. If we can improve the productivity of an e-mail user, we better do
– respects open standards and facilitate modern technologies. We value the vendor-neutrality that IMAP provides and are committed to be as interoperable as possible
– efficient — be it at conserving the network bandwidth, keeping memory use at a reasonable level or not hogging the system’s CPU
– can be used on many platforms. One UI is not enough for everyone, but our IMAP core works fine on anything from desktop computers to cell phones and big ERP systems
– plays well with the rest of the ecosystem. We don’t like reinventing wheels, but when the existing wheels quite don’t fit the tracks, we’re not afraid of making them work

Trojitá offers to manage contacts in the abook format, as introduced by the text-based user interface abook addressbook program.
In Autumn 2012, Trojitá became a part of the KDE community.

The project started as a private exercise in programming of Jan Kundrát in 2006.

Falkon

Falkon

Web site: www.falkon.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: FreeBSD, Haiku, Linux, OS/2, OS X, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++
First release: March 30, 2018

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Falkon – a KDE web browser using QtWebEngine rendering engine, previously known as QupZilla. It aims to be a lightweight web browser available through all major platforms. This project has been originally started only for educational purposes. But from its start, Falkon has grown into a feature-rich browser.

Falkon has all standard functions you expect from a web browser. It includes bookmarks, history (both also in sidebar) and tabs.

Falkon uses the Qt cross-platform application framework and offers a built-in AdBlock. By default this adblocker whitelists the web page of Falkon’s main search engine, DuckDuckGo.

Until version 2.0, QupZilla was using QtWebKit. QtWebKit is now deprecated and new versions are using QtWebEngine.

Epiphany

Epiphany

Web site: wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Web
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: Linux, Unix-like
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C
First release: December 24, 2002

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Web (originally called Epiphany until 2012) – a web browser for the GNOME desktop. Its goal is to be simple and easy to use. Epiphany ties together many GNOME components in order to let you focus on the Web content, instead of the browser application. As part of the GNOME project, Epiphany is Free Software.

Epiphany is based on the WebKit rendering engine and displays webpages with the same speed and accuracy as other popular browsers, such as Safari or Firefox. In addition, it provides an elegant, responsive and uncomplicated user interface that fits in perfectly with GNOME, and it has been translated to over sixty languages!

Epiphany aims to utilize the simplest interface possible for a browser. Keep in mind that simple does not necessarily mean less powerful. We believe the commonly used browsers of today are too big, buggy, and bloated. Epiphany addresses simplicity with a small browser designed for the web — not mail, newsgroups, file management, instant messanging or coffee making. The UNIX philosophy is to design small tools that do one thing, and do it well.

Epiphany also address simplicity with modularity to make a light and powerful application. If something can be implemented using external applications or components, we use it rather than wasting resources in the web browser. Integration with other desktop applications can also be achieved using DBus and the ever popular command line.

QupZilla

QupZilla

Web site: www.qupzilla.com
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: FreeBSD, Haiku, Linux, OS/2, OS X, Windows
License: GPLv3
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++
First release: December, 2010
Status: Not Active

QupZilla – a very fast QtWebEngine web browser. It aims to be a lightweight web browser available through all major platforms. This project has been originally started only for educational purposes. But from its start, QupZilla has grown into a feature-rich browser.

QupZilla has all standard functions you expect from a web browser. It includes bookmarks, history (both also in sidebar) and tabs. Above that, it has by default enabled blocking ads with a built-in AdBlock plugin.

The very first version of QupZilla has been released in December 2010 and it was written in Python with PyQt4 bindings. After a few versions, QupZilla has been completely rewritten in C++ with the Qt Framework. The Windows version of QupZilla was compiled using MingW, but due to a huge problem with Flash, it is now compiled with Microsoft Visual C++ Compiler 2008. First public release was 1.0.0-b4.

Until version 2.0, QupZilla was using QtWebKit. QtWebKit is now deprecated and new versions are using QtWebEngine.

In March 30, 2018 the developer informed that there is no more QupZilla releases, and the project has been switched to Falkon.