tnftp

tnftp

Web site:
Category: Network
Subcategory: File Transfer
Platform: UNIX-like
License: BSD
Interface: CLI
Programing language: ?
First release: March 1999
Rating:  star  star

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tnftp – enhanced ftp client.

The enhancements over the standard ftp client in 4.4BSD include:
* command-line editing within ftp
* command-line fetching of URLS, including support for:
– http proxies (c.f: $http_proxy, $ftp_proxy)
– authentication
* context sensitive command and filename completion
* dynamic progress bar
* IPv6 support (from the WIDE project)
* modification time preservation
* paging of local and remote files, and of directory listings (c.f: `lpage’, `page’, `pdir’)
* passive mode support, with fallback to active mode
* `set option’ override of ftp environment variables
* TIS Firewall Toolkit gate ftp proxy support (c.f: `gate’)
* transfer-rate throttling (c.f: `-T’, `rate’)

The project developer is Luke Mewburn.

ftp

ftp

Web site:
Category: Network
Subcategory: File Transfer
Platform: cross platform
License: BSD
Interface: CLI
Programing language: C
First release: 1983 ?
Rating:  star  star

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ftp – an user interface to the Internet standard File Transfer Protocol. The program allows a user to transfer files to and from a remote network site. Options may be specified at the command line, or to the command interpreter.

The ftp command appeared in 4.2BSD.

SymmetricDS

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Web site: www.symmetricds.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: File Backup and Sync
Platform: Android, Linux, OS X, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: CLI
Programing language: Java
First release: November 2007
Rating:  star  star  star  star

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SymmetricDS – an open source software for database replication, with support for one-way replication, multi-master replication, filtered synchronization, and transformations.

Using web and database technologies, it can replicate data asynchronously as a scheduled or near real-time operation. Designed to scale to a large number of databases and operate between different platforms, it works across low-bandwidth connections and can withstand periods of network outage.

SymmetricDS is compatible with most operating systems since it is based on Java. It can run on Windows, Linux, Unix, Mac OS X and other operating systems. For mobile applications using SQLite, the Java client libraries work on Android, and a minimal C library works with iOS applications.

Features:
– Remote offices replicated to a central office
– Cross platform database replication between different databases
– Replication between on-premise databases and cloud databases
– Consolidation of multiple databases into a data warehouse
– Regional database replication to improve access times for local users
– High availability of a database using a primary and secondary instance

SparkleShare

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Web site: www.sparkleshare.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: File Backup and Sync
Platform: Linux, OS X, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: CLI
Programing language: c#
First release: 2017 ?
Rating:  star  star  star

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SparkleShare – a file sharing and collaboration app. It works just like Dropbox, and you can run it on your own server. It’s available for Linux distributions, macOS, and Windows.

SparkleShare creates a special folder on your computer. You can add remotely hosted folders (or “projects”) to this folder. These projects will be automatically kept in sync with both the host and all of your peers when someone adds, removes or edits a file.

SparkleShare uses the version control system Git and the large files extension Git LFS, so setting up a host yourself is relatively easy. Using your own host gives you more privacy and control, as well as lots of cheap storage space and higher transfer speeds.

Features:
– Frequently changing project files, like text, office documents, and images
– Tracking and syncing files edited by multiple people
– Reverting a file to any point in its history
– Preventing spying on your files on the server using encryption

The project founder is Hylke Bons.

Procmail

Procmail

Web site: www.procmail.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: Linux, UNIX-like
License: GPL
Interface: CLI
Programing language: ?
First release: December 7, 1990
Rating:  star  star  star

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Procmail – a versatile e-mail processor and can be used to create mail-servers, mailing lists, sort your incoming mail into separate folders/files (very convenient when subscribing to one or more mailing lists or for prioritising your mail), preprocess your mail, start any programs upon mail arrival (e.g. to generate different chimes on your workstation for different types of mail) or selectively forward certain incoming mail automatically to someone.

Procmail was originally designed and developed by Stephen R. van den Berg. In the fall of 1998, recognizing that he didn’t have the time to maintain procmail on his own, Stephen created a mailing list for discussion of future development and deputized Philip A. Guenther as a maintainer.

Download

git://git.cuci.nl/procmail

getmail

getmail

Web site: pyropus.ca/software/getmail/
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: Linux, UNIX-like
License: GPL
Interface: CLI
Programing language: Python
First release: 1998
Rating:  star  star

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getmail – a mail retriever designed to allow you to get your mail from one or more mail accounts on various mail servers to your local machine for reading with a minimum of fuss. getmail is designed to be secure, flexible, reliable, and easy-to-use. getmail is designed to replace other mail retrievers such as fetchmail.

Features:
– simple to install, configure, and use
– retrieve virtually any mail
– support for accessing mailboxes with the following protocols: POP3, POP3-over-SSL, IMAP4, IMAP4-over-SSL, SDPS (Demon UK’s extensions to POP3)
– support for message filtering, classification, and annotation by external programs like spam filters and anti-virus programs
– support for delivering messages to different destinations based on the message recipient
– written in Python, and therefore easy to extend or customize

The project developer is Charles Cazabon.

fdm

fdm

Web site: github.com/nicm/fdm
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: Linux, UNIX-like
License: ISC
Interface: CLI
Programing language: C
First release: January 18, 2007
Rating:  star  star  star

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fdm (fetch/filter and deliver mail) – a program designed to fetch mail from POP3 or IMAP servers, or receive local mail from stdin, and deliver it in various ways.

The project developer is Nicholas Marriott.

Fetchmail

Fetchmail

Web site: www.fetchmail.info
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: Linux, UNIX-like
License: GPL
Interface: CLI
Programing language: C
First release: May ?
Rating:  star  star  star

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Fetchmail – a full-featured, robust, well-documented remote-mail retrieval and forwarding utility intended to be used over on-demand TCP/IP links (such as SLIP or PPP connections). It supports every remote-mail protocol now in use on the Internet: POP2, POP3, RPOP, APOP, KPOP, all flavors of IMAP, ETRN, and ODMR. It can even support IPv6 and IPSEC.

Fetchmail retrieves mail from remote mail servers and forwards it via SMTP, so it can then be read by normal mail user agents such as mutt, elm(1) or BSD Mail. It allows all your system MTA’s filtering, forwarding, and aliasing facilities to work just as they would on normal mail.

Fetchmail offers better protection against password-sniffing than any other Unix remote-mail client. It supports APOP, KPOP, OTP, Compuserve RPA, Microsoft NTLM, and IMAP RFC1731 encrypted authentication methods including CRAM-MD5 to avoid sending passwords en clair. It can be configured to support end-to-end encryption via tunneling with ssh, the Secure Shell.

Fetchmail can be used as a POP/IMAP-to-SMTP gateway for an entire DNS domain, collecting mail from a single drop box on an ISP and SMTP-forwarding it based on header addresses. (We don’t really recommend this, though, as it may lose important envelope-header information. ETRN or a UUCP connection is better.)

The original author of Fetchmail is Eric S. Raymond.

nmh

nmh

Web site: www.nongnu.org/nmh/
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: Linux, UNIX-like
License: Modified BSD
Interface: CLI
Programing language: ?
First release: May 2002 ?
Rating:  star  star  star

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nmh (new MH) – a powerful electronic mail handling system. It was originally based on version 6.8.3 of the MH message system developed by the RAND Corporation and the University of California. It is intended to be a (mostly) compatible drop-in replacement for MH. The MH was originally developed by Bruce S. Borden at RAND Corporation. Then Marshall T. Rose and John L. Romine at the University of California, Irvine, Information and Computer Sciences department maintained it until 1997 when version 6.8.5 was released.

nmh consists of a collection of fairly simple single-purpose programs to send, receive, save, retrieve, and manipulate e-mail messages. Since nmh is a suite rather than a single monolithic program, you may freely intersperse nmh commands with other commands at your shell prompt, or write custom scripts which use these commands in flexible ways.

All versions of nmh prior to 1.0.3 (as well as MH) contained a vulnerability where incoming mail messages with carefully designed MIME headers could cause the mhshow command to execute arbitrary shell code. Though the authors of nmh are not aware of any exploits of this hole, MH users and users of older versions of nmh are strongly encouraged to upgrade to the current version.

Front ends available:
– MH-V is a VI-like interface to mh.
– exmh is a TK-based GUI for mh.
– MH-E is an Emacs interface to mh.

Gnus

Gnus

Web site: www.gnus.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: Cross-platform
License: GPL
Interface: CLI
Programing language: ?
First release: 1987
Rating:  star  star  star

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Gnus (Gnus Network User Services) – a text based email reader which started as a standalone application but is part of GNU Emacs now. It supports reading and composing e-mail and news and can also act as an RSS reader, web processor, and directory browser for both local and remote filesystems.

Gnus can connect to the Gmail server in two ways: by POP3, or by IMAP. Each protocol behaves in a different way, so you can select the one which better suits your needs. Furthermore, as a third solution you can download your mail with an external program like fetchmail and let Gnus handle it locally.

Goals:
– Gnus is solid
– Works on all platforms
– Less hardware resource required
– Searcher and filter is great
– Mail can be viewed when offline. See the “offline” in section “Advanced tips”
– Powerful when used with other Emacs plugins like yasnippet

Gnus was originally written by Masanobu UMEDA in 1988, and went through a series of releases up until 1992.
Rewriting of GNUS started in late ’94. The first “proper” release of Gnus 5 was done in November 1995 when it was included in the Emacs 19.30 distribution (132 (ding) Gnus releases plus 15 Gnus 5.0 releases).
In May 1996 the next Gnus generation (aka. “September Gnus” (after 99 releases)) was released under the name “Gnus 5.2” (40 releases).
On July 28th 1996 work on Red Gnus was begun, and it was released on January 25th 1997 (after 84 releases) as “Gnus 5.4”.
Quassia Gnus was the next release. It was released as Gnus 5.6.
Then came Pterodactyl Gnus, which has now been released as Gnus 5.8/5.9.
Oort Gnus was started in October 2000. It’s big, it’s way out there, and it occasionally rains down death and destruction on innocent bystanders.
Oort Gnus was released as Gnus 5.10 in May 2003 – and Gnus 5.11 bundled with GNU Emacs 22.1 in June 2007.
Work on the following development version, dubbed No Gnus, was begun in January 2004. A version of No Gnus was released as Gnus 5.13 with GNU Emacs 23.1 in July 2009.

Stable versions of Gnus is included in the Emacs and XEmacs editors.

The Gnus screenshot source: Wikipedia; author: Shidai.liu; License: GNU GPL.