GNOME Feeds

GNOME Feeds

Web site: gitlab.gnome.org/World/gfeeds
Category: Network
Subcategory: RSS Readers
Platform: Linux
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Python
First release: July 2019
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GNOME Feeds – a minimal RSS/Atom feed reader with an adaptative UI. It is a Python3 GTK based application with a small screen compatible graphical user interface. It supports importing OPML files.

Empathy

Empathy

Web site: wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Empathy
Category: Network
Subcategory: Internet Messenger
Platform: BSD, Linux, UNIX-like
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C
First release: May 19, 2007 ?

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Empathy – a messaging program which supports text, voice, video chat, and file transfers over many different protocols. You can tell it about your accounts on all those services and do all your chatting within one application.

Empathy uses Telepathy for protocol support and has a user interface based on Gossip. Empathy is the default chat client in current versions of GNOME, making it easier for other GNOME applications to integrate collaboration functionality using Telepathy.

Main features of Empathy are:
– Multi-protocol: Google Talk (Jabber/XMPP), MSN, IRC, Salut, AIM, Facebook, Yahoo!, Gadu Gadu, Groupwise, ICQ and QQ. (Supported protocols depend on installed Telepathy Connection Manager components.) Supports all protocols supported by Pidgin
– File transfer for XMPP, and local networks
– Voice and video call using SIP, XMPP and Google Talk
– Some IRC support
– Conversation theming
– Sharing and viewing location information
– Private and group chat (with smileys and spell checking)
– Conversation logging
– Automatic away and extended away presence
– Automatic reconnection using Network Manager
– Python bindings for libempathy and libempathy-gt
– Support for collaborative applications (“tubes”)

The project founder is Xavier Claessens.

Evolution

Evolution

Web site: wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Evolution
Category: Network
Subcategory: E-mail Clients
Platform: Linux, UNIX-like
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C, GTK+
First release: May 10, 2000

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Evolution (previously: Novell Evolution and Ximian Evolution) – a personal information management application that provides integrated mail, calendar and address book applications from the Evolution Team.

Main functions are:
– support for multiple e-mail accounts
– virtual folders (sorting messages according to given criteria)
– mail search engine
– an unwanted mail filter that uses SpamAssassin or BogoFilter
– high security (SSL, TLS, PGP and other certificates)
– vCard and LDAP support
– support for palmtops
– calendar (also support for online calendars)
– reminder
– to-do list
– notebook
– integration of the calendar with the address book (automatic adding of birth)
– support for IMAP, POP3, SMTP, Exchange and other protocols
– mailing list support (NNTP protocol)
– RSS support

Evolution has a built-in support for groupware servers Novell GroupWise and Kolab, and with help of a free plug-in Novell Connector can also work with Microsoft Exchange (version 2000 or newer). There is also a plugin to work with OpenGroupware.org. Coordination of tasks with other network users is done through the open network protocol of iCalendar.

Epiphany

Epiphany

Web site: wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Web
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: Linux, Unix-like
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C
First release: December 24, 2002

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Web (originally called Epiphany until 2012) – a web browser for the GNOME desktop. Its goal is to be simple and easy to use. Epiphany ties together many GNOME components in order to let you focus on the Web content, instead of the browser application. As part of the GNOME project, Epiphany is Free Software.

Epiphany is based on the WebKit rendering engine and displays webpages with the same speed and accuracy as other popular browsers, such as Safari or Firefox. In addition, it provides an elegant, responsive and uncomplicated user interface that fits in perfectly with GNOME, and it has been translated to over sixty languages!

Epiphany aims to utilize the simplest interface possible for a browser. Keep in mind that simple does not necessarily mean less powerful. We believe the commonly used browsers of today are too big, buggy, and bloated. Epiphany addresses simplicity with a small browser designed for the web — not mail, newsgroups, file management, instant messanging or coffee making. The UNIX philosophy is to design small tools that do one thing, and do it well.

Epiphany also address simplicity with modularity to make a light and powerful application. If something can be implemented using external applications or components, we use it rather than wasting resources in the web browser. Integration with other desktop applications can also be achieved using DBus and the ever popular command line.