rcirc

rcirc

Web site: emacswiki.org/emacs/rcirc
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: Cross-platform
License: GPL
Interface: TUI
Programing language: Emacs-Lisp
First release:
line

rcirc – a next generation InternetRelayChat client. It blends seamlessly with the rest of Emacs, it’s tight, fast, and doesn’t light up like a christmas tree. rcirc also has sane defaults. There is little or no reason to customize it because it does what you want by default (except that many people still do).

rcirc is part of GNU Emacs since release 22.0.

Screenshot author: Roman Lagunov, Source: Wikimedia.org; License: GNU GPL

qwebirc

qwebirc

Web site: qwebirc.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: Cross-platform
License: GPL
Interface: Web interface
Programing language: JavaScript, Python
First release: 2008
line

qwebirc – a fast, easy to use, free and open source IRC client designed by and originally just for the QuakeNet IRC network.

Features:
– qwebirc is an AJAX IRC client.
– Open source (GPLv2).
– Supports most ircds out of the box.
– Multiple channels and queries.
– Nick list with menus.
– Scalability via trivial sharding with sticky sessions.
– Cross platform (pure Python), so works under Linux, FreeBSD, Windows, and probably more platforms.
– SSL/TLS support for the browser and server.
– Supports hot-reconfiguration of backend servers via hadns.
– Embedded webserver (no messing around with your existing webserver).
– Optional dedicated message and/or notice windows.
– Irssi style /msg, query, channel and nickname autocompletion (sorted correctly by last used/spoke order).
– Passes user hostnames through directly to the IRC server via the WEBIRC/CGIIRC commands.
– Keyboard shortcuts for window selection (alt+a, alt+1..0).
– Irssi style global input history.
– Mouse wheel on tabs.
– Unicode (UTF-8) support.
– Clickable channels, links and authnames.
– mIRC colour/underline/bold support.
– Minimalistic design with a neutral colour scheme.
– Irssi style multiple highlight levels.
– Wizard to allow users to easily embed the client into their own websites.
– Theming support.
– Notifications via sound and/or title/icon flashing.
– Direct user feedback support via email.
– Admin interface, allows viewing and control of connected users.
– Limited support for authserv/nickserv/chanserv.
– Heavily optimised to minimise bandwidth, cpu usage and browser load-time.

Copyright © 2008-2017 Chris Porter and the qwebirc project.

Monochrome

Monochrome

Web site: perkele.cc/software/monochrome
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C#
First release:
line

Monochrome – an IRC client intended for long-time IRC users. Its primary goals are security, reliability and stability despite IRC network failures or connectivity problems.

Features:
– Reliable automatic identification with NickServ on most popular IRC networks.
– Full Unicode support.
– Sending and receiving of DCC file transfers, with auto-accept whitelist.
– Ignore and half-ignore lists.
– Trigger word list.
– Auto-away, monitoring of away state of other users.
– Logging.
– Customizable command aliases.
– Variety of entertaining easter eggs.

The project founder is Peter Pawlowski.

LeafChat

LeafChat

Web site: leafdigital.com/software/leafchat/
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: Linux, OS X, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Java
First release: 2005
line

LeafChat – an IRC client for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux. Chat with your friends using popular IRC networks. LeafChat has a friendly, clean interface that doesn’t get in the way of your conversations. Connect to multiple servers at once on the same screen, so that it’s easy to keep up with all your friends. LeafChat is open source.

You can add features to LeafChat by installing ‘plug-ins’, which are pieces of Java software that run inside LeafChat.

Features:
– Connect to most standard servers – and, if your friends are in different places, connect to two, three or more at the same time.
– Chat in channels, in message windows, or through direct connection. Send files to others through DCC.
– Automatically log all conversations or just some. Set logs to be deleted after a few weeks, or never. View logs through a simple interface and export them to HTML for your web page.
– Create more complex functionality with built-in scripting based on Java™.

The project developer is Samuel Marshall.

Kirc

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Web site: kirc.io
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: Cross-platform
License: GPL
Interface: TUI
Programing language: C
First release: August 15, 2020
line

Kirc (KISS for IRC) – a tiny IRC client written in POSIX C99 designed with usability and cross-platform compatibility in mind.

Features:
– No dependencies other than a C99 compiler.
– Simple Authentication and Security Layer (SASL) protocol support.
– Client-to-client (CTCP) protocol support.
– Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol support (via external utilities).
– Simple chat history logging.
– Asynchronous message handling.
– Multi-channel joining at server connection.
– Full support for all RFC 2812 commands.
– Easy customized color scheme definition.

The project founder is Michael Czigler.

Instantbird

Instantbird

Web site: instantbird.com
Category: Network
Subcategory: IM, IRC clients
Platform: Linux, OS X, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C, JavaScript
First release: October 18, 2007
line

Instantbird – an instant messaging client with support for AOL, Yahoo, MSN, Google Talk, Twitter, Facebook, XMPP, IRC and ICQ. It supports for customization using themes and extensions built-in. Instantbird is built on the same technical platform as Firefox.

As of October 2017 development of Instantbird as a standalone product has been stopped.

Bromite Browser

Bromite Browser

Web site: bromite.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: Android
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: JavaScript, Go, HTML
First release: 2017
line

Bromite Browser – a Chromium fork with support for ad blocking and enhanced privacy. Bromite aims at providing a no-clutter browsing experience without privacy-invasive features and with the addition of a fast ad-blocking engine. Minimal UI changes are applied to help curbing the idea of “browser as an advertisement platform”.

Bromite is currently built for ARM, ARM64 and x86 and for the Android SDK versions 19 and 21; Bromite SystemWebView is provided as well (SDK21+). For every Bromite build you can always find a matching vanilla Chromium build which is used for example to verify which issues are specific to Bromite or not.

Features:
– customizable adblock filters via user-provided URL (see https://www.bromite.org/custom-filters)
– remove click-tracking and AMP from search results
– DNS-over-HTTPS support with any valid IETF DoH endpoint
– always-incognito mode
– disable all field trials permanently
– disable smart search by default, allow web search from incognito mode
– always-visible cookies, javascript and ads site settings
– remove Play integration binary blobs
– use CFI on all architectures except x86
– disable media router and remoting by default
– disable dynamic module loading
– show warnings for TLSv1.0/TLSv1.1 pages
– enable site-per-process isolation for all devices with memory > 1GB
– completely remove safe browsing and other privacy-unfriendly features
– proxy configuration page with PAC and custom proxy lists support
– settings to disable custom intents and clear session on exit
– flags to toggle anti-fingerprinting mitigations for canvas, audio, client rects, webGL and sensor APIs (see full list below for all the new flags)
– use frozen User-Agent to conceal real model and browser version
– privacy enhancement patches from Iridium, Inox patchset, Brave and ungoogled-chromium projects
– security enhancement patches from GrapheneOS project
– disable scroll-to-text-fragment
– reduced referer granularity
– block gateway attacks via websockets
– use 64-bit ABI for webview processes
– make all favicon requests on-demand (supercookie mitigation)
– enable all network isolation features
– ignore enterprise policies that disallow secure DNS
– ask permission to play protected media
– disable the DIAL repeating discovery

IceChat

IceChat

Web site: icechat.net
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C#
First release: April 8, 2002
line

IceChat – an IRC (Internet Relay Chat) client that can be used in 64bit versions of Windows 7/8/8.1 and Windows 10.

IceChat is a very user friendly program that can be setup in a matter of minutes. IceChat is capable of connecting to multiple servers and channels all at once, with ease, so you can easily chat with your friends in your favorite channels.

IceChat has some unique features that set it apart from other similar programs. Most users truly enjoy the built in Emoticons. The Favorite Server Tree is truly fantastic, and because IceChat is built around its multi-server capabilities, it is an essential part of IceChat that makes it that much easier to use.

IceChat started in development in 2000, and has gone through many changes in its interface, design, and of course its many features.
IceChat is FreeWare, meaning anyone can use it, at no cost. IceChat 9 is open sourced, written in C#, and available at Github.

The main IceChat Support channel is located on Quakenet (irc.quakenet.org) in the #icechat channel. The IceChat 9 Support/Developer channel is located on Freenode in the #icechat channel.

The project founder is Paul Vanderzee.

Grumpy

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Web site: github.com/grumpy-irc/grumpy
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: Linux
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++
First release: 2015
line

Grumpy – a modern, yet oldschool IRC client with distributed core, written in C++. Grumpy is a very advanced IRC client. It takes the best out of every major IRC client and leaves out the bad. It’s designed for old school IRC users who need to be able to take most out of IRC.

Some features:
* Written in C++ (Qt) portable to every major platform
* Distributed core (grumpyd) similar to Quassel IRC
* Modular design, you can take the core library and build a different interface on top of it
* Very scalable and extendable, support for extensions written in C++ or JavaScript
* Support all IRC standards and networks
* Supports IRCv3 protocol (http://ircv3.net/)
* Extensible and very powerfull auto-completion mechanism

Inspired by:
* mIRC
* Quassel
* KVirc
* Pidgeon

F-IRC

F-IRC

Web site: vanheusden.com/f-irc/
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: UNIX-like
License: GPL
Interface: TUI
Programing language: C++
First release:
line

F-IRC – an IRC client for terminals/command-line/console. Its goal is to be as user friendly as possible with easy navigation and keyboard shortcuts for quick navigation. It has an as much a gentle learning curve as possible.

From the project page:

Why?

I wrote it because I had too many problems with irssi. For a lot (most?) people irssi is perfect but I wanted an easy, clear interface like XChat and mIRC usable from within a terminal window (and compatible to GNU screen). I wanted easy channel select navigation, a pop-up menu for actions and easy to configure. There was no such thing at that time.

F-IRC was analyzed by Coverity Scan, CPPCheck and LLVM’s scan-build for software defects.

The project founder is Folkert van Heusden.