WebPositive

WebPositive

Web site: www.haiku-os.org/docs/userguide/en/applications/webpositive.html
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web Browsers
Platform: Haiku
License: BSD, GPL, MIT
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++
First release: February 2010
Rating:  star  star  star

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WebPositive (or Web+) – the Haiku native web browser. One part of its name is a tip of the hat to BeOS’ simple NetPositive, the other points to its modern foundation: the WebKit. This open source HTML rendering library is at the heart of other mainstream browsers as well, like Safari of Mac OS X and Google’s Chrome. By using the ever evolving WebKit, Web+ will be able to keep up with new web technologies.

Webpositive supports most HTML5 features, including ‘audio’ and ‘video’ support, while geolocation support is still being worked on. WebPositive does not currently support any form of plugins, although developer Stephan Aßmus has suggested that he may look into plugin support in the future.

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Astroid

Astroid

Web site: astroidmail.github.io
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: BSD, Linux, UNIX-like
License: GPL, LGPL, BSD
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C
First release: November 30, 2014
Rating:  star  star  star

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Astroid – a lightweight and fast Mail User Agent that provides a graphical interface to searching, displaying and composing email, organized in threads and tags. Astroid uses the notmuch backend for blazingly fast searches through tons of email. Astroid searches, displays and composes emails – and rely on other programs for fetching, syncing and sending email. Check out Astroid in your general mail setup for a suggested complete e-mail solution.

Main features of the Astroid are:
– lightweight and fast
– fully operable by keyboard.
– graphical interface. buffers can be placed in separate windows.
– display html mail and common attachments inline.
– themable and configurable.
– built-in crypto (PGP/MIME) support.
– editors: embedded or external vim or emacs (or your favourite editor).
– syntax highlighting of patches and code segments.
– python and lua plugins.

Sylpheed

Sylpheed

Web site: sylpheed.sraoss.jp/en/
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: BSD, Linux, OS X, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL, LGPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C, GTK+
First release: January 1, 2000
Rating:  star  star  star  star

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Sylpheed – a simple, lightweight but featureful, and easy-to-use e-mail client which provides intuitive user-interface. Sylpheed is also designed for keyboard-oriented operation, so Sylpheed can be widely used from beginners to power users.

The e-mail client runs on many systems such as Windows, Linux, BSD, Mac OS X and other Unix-like systems and uses GTK+ GUI toolkit. The newest version of Sylpheed works with GTK+ 2.4 or later (2.6 or later is recommended).

Main features are:
– Simple, beautiful, and well-polished user interface
– Comfortable operationality which is built in detail
– Well-organized, easy-to-understand configuration
– Lightweight operation
– High reliability with one-mail-corresponding-to-one-file format
– Extensibility by plug-in faculty
– Powerful filtering and search
– Junk mail control
– Security features (GnuPG, SSL/TLSv1)
– Various protocols support
– Internationalization and Multilingualization support
– High-level Japanese processing
– Flexible cooperation with external commands

Sylpheed is a free software distributed under the GNU GPL (the library part is GNU LGPL). You can freely use, modify and redistribute it under the license.

The project developer is Yamamoto Hiroyuki.

Safari

Safari

Web site: www.apple.com/safari/
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: iOS, OS X
License: BSD, EULA, LGPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++, Objective-C
First release: January 7, 2003
Rating:  star  star  star  star

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Safari – a web browser developed by Apple Inc. based on the WebKit engine and is available for Mac OS X and iOS operating systems.

First released as a public beta on January 7, 2003, on the company’s OS X operating system, it became Apple’s default browser beginning with Mac OS X v10.3 “Panther”. The native browser of iOS is also called Safari, but has a different graphical user interface (GUI) and uses a different WebKit version and application programming interface (API).

A version of Safari for the Microsoft Windows operating system was first released on June 11, 2007, and supported Windows XP Service Pack 2, or later, but it has been discontinued. Safari 5.1.7, released on May 9, 2012, is the last version available for Windows.

Apple’s internet browser, and it is only compatible with Mac computers, iPhones and iPads. It isn’t as versatile as browsers like Firefox and Chrome because it isn’t compatible with other operating systems, which is why it didn’t score high enough to be our top pick. Still, it is fast and easy to use, and it syncs your browser settings across all your Apple devices. However, Safari isn’t as customizable as other web browsers.

Some of Safari goals are:
– Native support for Netflix and plays HTML5 video everywhere it’s available
– Can browse for up to two hours longer than other web browsers
– Stop auto-play videos
– Defending your online privacy and security
– Intelligent Tracking Prevention
– Sandboxing provides built-in protection against malicious code and malware by restricting what websites can do
– Using Private Browsing, Safari doesn’t remember the pages you visit, your search history, or your AutoFill information
– Helps protect you against fraudulent Internet sites and those that harbor malware — before you visit them
– Pay easily and securely with Apple Pay
– Surf seamlessly across all your devices

The Safari screenshot source is Wikipedia; author: silverstripe.com; license: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Geary

Geary

Web site: wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Geary
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients
Platform: Linux, UNIX-like
License: LGPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Vala, GTK+
First release: May 4, 2012
Rating:  star  star  star  star

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Geary – a free and ope source email application built around conversations, for the GNOME 3 desktop. It allows you to read, find and send email with a straightforward, modern interface. It is written in Vala, which is based on WebKitGTK+. The project originally was developed by the Yorba Foundation (Adam Dingle is the Yorba founder) and then been adopted by the GNOME project.

Features:
– Quick email account setup
– Shows related messages together in conversations
– Fast, full text and keyword search
– Full-featured HTML and plain text message composer
– Desktop notification of new mail
– Compatible with Gmail, Yahoo! Mail, Outlook.com and other IMAP servers

Geary internally uses an SQLite database to store a local copy of emails and for indexing. It uses a fully asynchronous GObject-based IMAP client library. One feature that distinguishes Geary from other open source email clients is the conversation view.

SeaMonkey

SeaMonkey Navigator

SeaMonkey E-mail    SeaMonkey Chatzilla    SeaMonkey Composer    SeaMonkey Address Book

Web site: www.seamonkey-project.org
Category: Network, Office
Subcategory: Web browsers, Email Clients, IRC Clients, HTML Editors
Platform: Linux, OS X, Windows
License: GPL, LGPL, MPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++, JavaScript, XUL, XBL
First release: January 30, 2006
Rating:  star  star  star  star  star

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SeaMonkey – a community effort to develop the SeaMonkey all-in-one internet application suite. Such a software suite was previously made popular by Netscape and Mozilla, and the SeaMonkey project continues to develop and deliver high-quality updates as well as new features and improvements to this concept. Containing an Internet browser, email & newsgroup client, HTML editor, IRC chat and web development tools, SeaMonkey is sure to appeal to advanced users, web developers and corporate users.

SeaMonkey is built on the open source Mozilla Gecko engine, the same code which underlies the highly successful siblings Firefox and Thunderbird. SeaMonkey benefits from the cross-fertilization with these other projects, by gaining (and contributing) new features and the ongoing security updates which are a modern necessity. The Mozilla Foundation provides hosting and legal backing for the SeaMonkey Project.

SeaMonkey is the continuation of the former Mozilla Application Suite, based on the same source code, which itself grew out of Netscape Communicator and formed the base of Netscape 6 and Netscape 7.

The SeaMonkey all-in-one internet application suite is composed of:
– The Internet browser at the core of the SeaMonkey suite uses the same rendering engine and application platform as its sibling Mozilla Firefox, with popular features like tabbed browsing, feed detection, popup blocking, smart location bar, find as you type and a lot of other functionality for a smooth web experience.
– SeaMonkey Mail and Newsgroups client shares lots of code with Mozilla Thunderbird and features adaptive Junk mail filtering, tags and mail views, web feeds reading, tabbed messaging, multiple accounts, S/MIME, address books with LDAP support and is ready for both private and corporate use.
– An easy-to-use HTML Editor
– The ChatZilla IRC chat application
– Web development tools like a DOM Inspector and a JavaScript debugger
– SeaMonkey can be extended with numerous add-ons that provide additional functionality and customization for a complete Internet experience.

IceCat

IceCat

Web site: www.gnu.org/software/gnuzilla/
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: Linux, OS X, Windows
License: MPL, GPL, LGPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C
First release: 2005 ?
Rating:  star  star  star  star

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IceCat (GNU IceCat) – a GNU version of the Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR) web browser. Its main advantage is an ethical one: it is entirely free software. While the Firefox source code from the Mozilla project is free software, they distribute and recommend non-free software as plug-ins and addons. Also their trademark license imposes requirements for the distribution of modified versions that make it inconvenient to exercise freedom 3.

GNU IceCat was formerly known as GNU IceWeasel but changed its name in 2008 to avoid confusion with Debian IceWeasel (who was rebranded back to Firefox in 2017 after Debian was being granted special permission from Mozilla).

Important differences between Mozilla’s Firefox and GNU IceCat is that IceCat is focused on freedom and privacy:
– Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) is not implemented
– Widevine Content Decryption Module provided by Google Inc. is not installed in about:addons > Plugins
– The Play DRM-controlled content option has been removed from about:preferences > Content
– WebRTC is enabled like in Firefox but prevent leaking the LAN IP
– The proprietary Mibbit is been removed
– Telemetry is disabled
– DuckDuckGo is the default search engine
– SpyBlock (Adblock Plus fork) to block privacy trackers is installed as default
– Https-Everywhere extension that encrypts your communications with many major websites, making your browsing more secure is installed
– Fingerprinting is a series of techniques allowing to uniquely identify a browser based on specific characterisics of that particular instance, is installed

The binary packages for Windows and macOS requires non-free software, so they are not distributed for those platforms (source code only).

Conkeror

Conkeror

Web site: conkeror.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: Linux, OS X, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL, LGPL, MPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: JavaScript
First release: ?
Rating:  star  star  star

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Conkeror – a keyboard-oriented, highly-customizable, highly-extensible web browser based on Mozilla XULRunner, written mainly in JavaScript, and inspired by exceptional software such as Emacs and vi. Conkeror features a sophisticated keyboard system, allowing users to run commands and interact with content in powerful and novel ways. It is self-documenting, featuring a powerful interactive help system.

Conkeror emphasizes Emacs-derived key bindings and keyboard-based browser navigation. Like Emacs, Conkeror makes use of buffers in order to allow multiple pages to remain open at the same time (similar to tabs in traditional browsers). Users can open new buffers and navigate through them using key bindings.

The Conkeror browser can be customized in many ways using JavaScript as the scripting language, much in the way that Emacs uses Emacs Lisp.
Conkeror can block images, scripts, etc originating from servers that match one of conkeror’s adblock patterns.
Conkeror does work (more or less) with Pale Moon browser, which forked from Firefox 24, and maintains the XUL framework.

The project founder is Shawn Betts.

Chromium

Chromium

Web site: www.chromium.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: Android, BSD, Linux, OS X, Windows
License: BSD, GPL, LGPL, MIT, MPL, MS-PL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C, C++, Java, JavaScript, Python
First release: September 2, 2008
Rating:  star  star  star  star  star

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Chromium – an open-source browser project that aims to build a safer, faster, and more stable way for all Internet users to experience the web. Google’s browser Chrome is built from the Chromium source code and the Chromium releases appear essentially similar to recent releases of Google Chrome, bypassing specific additions from Google, the most notable among them are: Google brand, automatic update mechanism, licensing terms, usage tracking, built-in PDF reader and integration with Flash Player. Chromium uses the WebKit engine.

Chromium (Latin: chromium) is the name given to the open-source project and the browser source code released and maintained by the Chromium Project, which is headed by Google developers, with input from community developers. Google’s intention was, as stated in the technical documentation, that Chromium be the name of an open source project and the name of the final product was Chrome. However, other developers have taken the Chromium source code and released versions under the name Chromium.

A part of Chromium, which was authored by Google is released under the BSD license, with other parts subject to other open licenses, including: X11, LGPL, Ms-PL and the three-way license MPL/GPL/LGPL.

Many developers have compiled Chromium’s open source code and made own versions of the web browser under new names, such as: CoolNovo, Comodo Dragon, Flock, Opera, Iron, Min, Rockmelt, SlimJet, Vivaldi.

uGet

uGet

Web site: ugetdm.com
Category: Network
Subcategory: Download Managers
Platform: Android, BSD, Linux, OS X, Windows
License: LGPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C, GTK
First release: January 2003
Rating:  star  star  star  star  star

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uGet – an Open Source download manager application for GNU/Linux developed with GTK+, which also comes packaged as a portable Windows app.

uGet uses very few resources while at the same time packs an unparalleled powerful feature set. These features include a Queue, Pause/Resume, Multi-Connection (with adaptive segment management), Mirrors (multi-source), Multi-Protocol, Advanced Categorization, Clipboard Monitor, Batch Downloads, Individualized Category Default Settings, Speed Limiting, Total Active Downloads Control, and so much more!

Features: multiple parallel streams for download acceleration, Download Queue, Pause & Resume downloads, Advanced Category Management, Browser Integration, Clipboard Monitoring, Batch Downloads, localized into 23 Languages.

uGet was originally a GTK+2 based application that worked on various GTK+2 based distributions but in 2011 was upgraded to GTK+3 in anticipation of the technology advancement in the Linux Desktop.

The uGet project founder is C.H. Huang.