ICQ

ICQ

Web site: icq.com
Category: Network
Subcategory: Instant Messengers
Platform: Android, iOS, Linux, OS X, Windows, Web
License: Proprietary
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++, Objective-C, Java
First release: November 15, 1996
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ICQ – a convenient and easy to use messenger service. It offers application clients for mobile devices such as Android and iOS, and desktop machines which works under Linux, OS X and MS Windows, and a web browser client as well.

Features:
– securely encrypted calls
– high-quality video calls
– speech-to-text for voice messages
– ability to create your own stickers
– animated 3D masks and video calls
– groups and channels
– chat synchronization across all devices

The project started and was developed by the Israeli company Mirabilis in 1996, the client was bought by AOL in 1998, and then by Mail.Ru Group in 2010.

Threema

Threema

Web site: threema.ch
Category: Network
Subcategory: VoIP Clients, IM
Platform: Android, iOS, Web client
License: AGPL, MIT
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C, Objective-C, Java
First release: December 2012
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Threema – a secure messenger which keeps your data out of the hands of hackers, corporations, and governments. Threema can be used completely anonymously, allows to make end-to-end encrypted voice and video calls, and offers every feature one would expect from a state-of-the-art instant messenger. With Threema Web, you can also use Threema from your Desktop.

Features:
– Text and Voice Messages – Quickly and conveniently send text messages. If you don’t have the time to type, voice messages come in handy.
– Groups and Distribution Lists – Groups and distribution lists allow to send messages to multiple recipients at once. Groups are managed in a strictly decentralized manner. Except the group members themselves, no one – not even Threema – knows who is member of a group.
– Threema Web: Conveniently Chat from the Desktop – Thanks to Threema Web, chatting from the desktop is just as secure as using the Threema app on your phone. You have full access to your entire chat history as well as all contacts and media files. Threema Web is open source.
– Share Files, Media, and Locations – Use Threema to send any type of file. Just like text messages, files are end-to-end encrypted, of course.
– Handy Poll Feature – Create polls in no time to gather the other group members’ opinions in an efficient manner.
– Voice and Video Calls – Place calls without revealing your phone number. Threema calls are end-to-end encrypted and thus tap-proof. They impress with crystal-clear voice quality and brilliant video quality.

Threema is developed by the Swiss company Threema GmbH.

Telephone

Telephone

Web site: 64characters.com/telephone/
Category: Network
Subcategory: VoIP Clients
Platform: OS X
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Objective-C, Swift
First release: 2015 ?
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Telephone – a VoIP program which allows you to make phone calls over the internet. It can be used to call regular phones via any appropriate SIP provider. If your office or home phone works via SIP, you can use that phone number on your Mac anywhere you have decent internet connection.

Telephone Pro is a subscription that unlocks the full call history, allows 30 simultaneous calls, and supports app development. Please consider buying it to make ongoing development possible.

Colloquy

Colloquy

Web site: colloquy.info/
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC Clients
Platform: iOS, OS X
License: GPL, BSD
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Objective-C
First release: 2004

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Colloquy – an advanced IRC, SILC & ICB client which aims to fill this void. By adhering to Mac OS X interface conventions, Colloquy has the look and feel of a quality Mac application.

Colloquy supports a variety of different text modifications. One text manipulation supported by Colloquy is the use of colors as used by mIRC; with the primary colors being: White, Black, Navy, Forest, Red, Maroon, Purple, Orange, Yellow, Green, Teal, Cyan, Blue, Magenta, Grey, and Ash. Additionally, Colloquy supports formatting text with underlining, italics, bold, and outline.

Colloquy supports scripting in languages such as AppleScript, F-Script, JavaScript, Objective-C and Python. Colloquy shows changes such as mode changes, ban sets, etc. in a human-readable format, rather than showing raw modes.

The application can be extended with plug-ins, and it also works with AppleScript.

GNUMail

GNUMail

Web site: www.collaboration-world.com/gnumail/ (not active)
Category: Network
Subcategory: E-mail Clients
Platform: Cross-platform
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Objective-C
First release: 2001

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GNUMail – an official GNUstep mail application and a clone of NeXT’s Mail.app. This is a fork of the original project that has several years without activity.

It uses the GNUstep development framework (or Apple Cocoa, which is based on the OpenStep specification provided by NeXT, Inc.).

Features:
– Supported protocols: POP3 (with APOP support), IMAP4 and UNIX; SMTP
– Supports TLS with all protocols
– Mail spool file support for receiving
– File formats for local saving: Maildir, Berkeley mbox
– Filters for incoming and outgoing mail which support regular expressions
– Thread Arcs for email thread visualization and navigation
– Find Panel supporting regular expressions
– Ability to add custom mailheaders
– Native support for PGP/GPG encryption

The project developers:
– 2001-2003 Ludovic Marcotte, Ujwal S. Sathyam, Jonathan B. Leffert, Francis Lachapelle and others
– 2003-2007 Ludovic Marcotte, Ujwal S. Sathyam
– 2011-2018 German Arias, Yavor Doganov, Sebastian Reitebnach, Riccardo Mottola and others

Adium

Adium

Web site: www.adium.im
Category: Network
Subcategory: Instant Messenger, IRC Clients
Platform: OS X
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Objective-C, Cacao
First release: September 28, 2001

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Adium – a free and open source instant messaging application for Mac OS X that can connect to AIM, XMPP (Jabber), ICQ, IRC and more. Based on the libpurple protocol library, Adium can connect you to any number of messaging accounts on any combination of supported messaging services (see further down for the list) and then chat with other people using those services.

The main features of Adium are:
– Open Source, so everyone can see how Adium works and help improve it.
– Support for a wide range of different Instant Messaging services
– A delightful UI: Tabbed chat windows
– Mac OS X integration: Address Book integration and WebKit Message View: Theme your chat windows
– Combined Contacts: Merge your contacts so that each one represents a person, not an account
– A sophisticated events system including support for visual notifications via Growl and OS X’s Notification Center
– OTR Encryption
– File Transfer
– Xtras and many, many other customization options
– A beautiful icon, the “Adiumy” duck
– Translations: Adium speaks 27 different languages

Adium supports protocols such as:
– XMPP (including Google Talk, Facebook Chat, and LiveJournal services)
– OSCAR (including AIM and ICQ)
– Twitter
– Bonjour
– IRC
– Novell GroupWise
– IBM Sametime
– Gadu-Gadu

Adium also supports protocols via plugins:
– Skype & Skype for Business Server
– Telegram
– QQ
– Steam chat
– NateOn

The project founder is Adam Iser.

Safari

Safari

Web site: www.apple.com/safari/
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: iOS, OS X
License: BSD, EULA, LGPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C++, Objective-C
First release: January 7, 2003

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Safari – a web browser developed by Apple Inc. based on the WebKit engine and is available for Mac OS X and iOS operating systems.

First released as a public beta on January 7, 2003, on the company’s OS X operating system, it became Apple’s default browser beginning with Mac OS X v10.3 “Panther”. The native browser of iOS is also called Safari, but has a different graphical user interface (GUI) and uses a different WebKit version and application programming interface (API).

A version of Safari for the Microsoft Windows operating system was first released on June 11, 2007, and supported Windows XP Service Pack 2, or later, but it has been discontinued. Safari 5.1.7, released on May 9, 2012, is the last version available for Windows.

Apple’s internet browser, and it is only compatible with Mac computers, iPhones and iPads. It isn’t as versatile as browsers like Firefox and Chrome because it isn’t compatible with other operating systems, which is why it didn’t score high enough to be our top pick. Still, it is fast and easy to use, and it syncs your browser settings across all your Apple devices. However, Safari isn’t as customizable as other web browsers.

Some of Safari goals are:
– Native support for Netflix and plays HTML5 video everywhere it’s available
– Can browse for up to two hours longer than other web browsers
– Stop auto-play videos
– Defending your online privacy and security
– Intelligent Tracking Prevention
– Sandboxing provides built-in protection against malicious code and malware by restricting what websites can do
– Using Private Browsing, Safari doesn’t remember the pages you visit, your search history, or your AutoFill information
– Helps protect you against fraudulent Internet sites and those that harbor malware — before you visit them
– Pay easily and securely with Apple Pay
– Surf seamlessly across all your devices

The Safari screenshot source is Wikipedia; author: silverstripe.com; license: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported