Wget

Wget

Web site: www.gnu.org/software/wget/
Category: Network
Subcategory: Download managers
Platform: Amiga, BSD, HP-UX, Linux, MorphOS, OpenVMS, OS X, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: CLI
Programing language: C
First release: January, 1996
Rating:  star  star  star

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Wget (prevoiusly: Getur) – a free software package for retrieving files using HTTP, HTTPS, FTP and FTPS the most widely-used Internet protocols. It is a non-interactive commandline tool, so it may easily be called from scripts, cron jobs, terminals without X-Windows support.

Wget is non-interactive, meaning that it can work in the background, while the user is not logged on. This allows you to start a retrieval and disconnect from the system, letting Wget finish the work. By contrast, most of the Web browsers require constant user’s presence, which can be a great hindrance when transferring a lot of data.

Wget can follow links in HTML, XHTML, and CSS pages, to create local versions of remote web sites, fully recreating the directory structure of the original site. This is sometimes referred to as “recursive downloading.” While doing that, Wget respects the Robot Exclusion Standard (/robots.txt). Wget can be instructed to convert the links in downloaded files to point at the local files, for offline viewing.

Wget has been designed for robustness over slow or unstable network connections; if a download fails due to a network problem, it will keep retrying until the whole file has been retrieved. If the server supports regetting, it will instruct the server to continue the download from where it left off.

Main features of Wget are:
– Can resume aborted downloads, using REST and RANGE
– Can use filename wild cards and recursively mirror directories
– NLS-based message files for many different languages
– Optionally converts absolute links in downloaded documents to relative, so that downloaded documents may link to each other locally
– Runs on most UNIX-like operating systems as well as Microsoft Windows
– Supports HTTP proxies
– Supports HTTP cookies
– Supports persistent HTTP connections
– Unattended / background operation
– Uses local file timestamps to determine whether documents need to be re-downloaded when mirroring

The project developer are Giuseppe Scrivano and Hrvoje Nikšić.

Lynx

Lynx

Web site: lynx.invisible-island.net
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: BSD, DOS, Linux, OS/2, OpenVMS, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: CLI
Programing language: ISO C
First release: 1992
Rating:  star  star

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Lynx – a fully-featured World Wide Web (WWW) client for users running cursor-addressable, character-cell display devices (e.g., vt100 terminals, vt100 emulators running on PCs or Macs, or any other character-cell display).

Lynx was a product of the Distributed Computing Group within Academic Computing Services of the University of Kansas,[9][10] and was initially developed in 1992 by a team of students and staff at the university (Lou Montulli, Michael Grobe and Charles Rezac) as a hypertext browser used solely to distribute campus information as part of a Campus-Wide Information Server and for browsing the Gopher space.

It will display Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) documents containing links to files on the local system, as well as files on remote systems running http, gopher, ftp, wais, nntp, finger, or cso/ph/qi servers, and services accessible via logins to telnet, tn3270 or rlogin accounts (see URL Schemes Supported by Lynx). Current versions of Lynx run on Unix, VMS, Windows3.x/9x/NT and later, 386DOS and OS/2 EMX.

Lynx can be used to access information on the WWW, or to build information systems intended primarily for local access. For example, Lynx has been used to build several Campus Wide Information Systems (CWIS). In addition, Lynx can be used to build systems isolated within a single LAN.

Links

Links

Web site: links.twibright.com
Category: Network
Subcategory: Web browsers
Platform: DOS, Linux, OpenVMS, OS/2, OS X, UNIX-like, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI, CLI
Programing language: C
First release: 1999
Rating:  star  star

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Links – a web browser running in both graphics and text mode released under GPL, Links is a free software.

Links features:
– runs on Linux, BSD, UNIX in general, OS/2, Cygwin under Windows, AtheOS, BeOS, FreeMint
– runs in graphics mode (mouse required) on X Window System (UN*X, Cygwin), SVGAlib, Linux Framebuffer, OS/2 PMShell, AtheOS GUI
– runs in text mode (mouse optional) on UN*X console, ssh/telnet virtual terminal, vt100 terminal, xterm, and virtually any other text terminal. Mouse is supported for GPM, xterm, and OS/2. Links supports colors on terminal
– ported to Sony PSP platform as PSPRadio
– ported to BeOS with GUI support, also runs on Haiku
– easy and quick user control via pull-down menu in both text and graphics mode, in 25 languages
– HTML 4.0 support (without CSS)
– HTTP 1.1 support
– tables, frames in both graphics and text mode, builtin image display in graphics mode
– builtin image display for GIF, JPEG, PNG, XBM, TIFF in graphics mode
– anti-advertisement animation filter in animated GIFs
– bookmarks
– background file downloads
– automatic reconnection in case of TCP connection breakdown
– keepalive connections
– background (asynchronous) DNS lookup
– possibility to hook up external programs for all MIME types, possibility to choose one of more programs at every opening
– 48-bit high-quality image gamma correction, resampling and Floyd-Steinberg dithering in all color depths
– font resampling (antialiasing) for virtually unlimited pitch range, LCD optimization of fonts and images
– builtin fonts in the executable without reliance on any fonts installed in the system
– user-adjustable menu, HTML font size and image zoom factor
– user-adjustable display gammas (red, green, blue), viewing-condition correction gamma and precise calibration of both monitor and Links on a calibration pattern
– automatic aspect ratio correction for modes like 640×200, 640×400, 320×200 with user-adjustable manual aspect ratio correction
– support for one-wheel mice (vertical scroll), two-wheel mice (vertical and horizontal scroll) and smooth scrolling by grabbing the plane with a mouse (no wheel needed)

Links authors: 1999-2002 Mikulas Patocka, 2000-2002 Karel Kulhavy, Petr Kulhavy, Martin Pergel. Mikuláš Patočka started writing Links (text mode those days) in 1999. In 2000 Marting Pergel, Petr Kulhavý and Karel Kulhavý joined the project to add graphics and Javascript capabilities into Links together with Mikuláš Patočka. The program has been written mainly as a hobby and also as a school project.