Discourse

Discourse

Web site: discourse.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: Forums
Platform: Linux, OS X, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: Web
Programing language: Ruby
First release: 2013
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Discourse – an open source discussion platform built for the next decade of the Internet. It can be used as a mailing list, discussion forum or long-form chat room.

Discourse breaks with existing schemes of present forum applications by including additional features that are available mainly for social networking applications. These features include, among others: scrolling, live updates, oneboxing, expandable links, and the ability to drag and drop attachments. Although these options are more social than technical, they improve the quality of online discussions through the extended database of forum applications.

The Discourse application is written in the JavaScript and Ruby on Rails programming language, requires the PostgreSQL database system and uses the Ember.js framework.

The application is (or was) used by companies and organizations such as: Atom (word processor), Boing Boing, CISCO, Docker, How-To Geek, Mozilla, Open Knowledge, SitePoint Forums, TalkSurf, The Daily WTF, Twitter, Ubuntu.

The project founders in 2013 were: Jeff Atwood, Robin Ward and Sam Saffron

Twitter CLI

Twitter CLI

Web site: github.com/sferik/t
Category: Network
Subcategory: Microblog Clients
Platform: Linux, UNIX-like
License: MIT
Interface: CLI
Programing language: Ruby
First release: November 23, 2011

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Twitter CLI – a command-line power tool for Twitter. The CLI takes syntactic cues from the Twitter SMS commands, but it offers vastly more commands and capabilities than are available via SMS.

Features:
– Deep search: Instead of using the Twitter Search API, which only goes back 6-9 days, t search fetches up to 3,200 tweets via the REST API and then checks each one against a regular expression.
– Multi-threaded: Whenever possible, Twitter API requests are made in parallel, resulting in faster performance for bulk operations.
– Designed for Unix: Output is designed to be piped to other Unix utilities, like grep, comm, cut, awk, bc, wc, and xargs for advanced text processing.
– Generate spreadsheets: Convert the output of any command to CSV format simply by adding the –csv flag.
– 95% C0 Code Coverage: Well tested, with a 2.5:1 test-to-code ratio

Twitter API v1.1 requires OAuth for all of its functionality, so you’ll need a registered Twitter application.
A mobile phone number must be associated with your account in order to obtain write privileges.

The project developer is Erik Michaels-Ober.

Sup

Sup

Web site: sup-heliotrope.github.io
Category: Network
Subcategory: E-mail clients
Platform: BSD, Linux, OS X
License: GPL
Interface: CLI
Programing language: Ruby
First release: 2006 ?

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Sup – a console-based email client for people with a lot of email.

It presents an interface of a list of threads, which are each hierarchical collections email messages. Threads can have multiple tags applied to them. It supports a very fast full-text search, automatic contact-list management, custom code insertion via a Ruby hook system, and more.

Features of Sup are:
– Handle massive amounts of email.
– Fast, local full-text index of messages.
– Mix email from different sources: mbox files and maildirs.
– Instantaneously search over your entire email collection. Search over body text, or use a query language to combine search predicates in any way.
– Handle multiple accounts. Replying to email sent to a particular account will use the correct SMTP server, signature, and from address.
– Add custom code to handle certain types of messages or to handle certain types of text within messages.
– Take care of your privacy with full support of gpg.
– Organize email with user-defined labels, automatically track recent contacts, and much more!

Sup is written in Ruby, originally by William Morgan, but now maintained and developed by the Sup community.