Forté Agent

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Web site: forteinc.com/agent/index.php
Category: Network
Subcategory: Email Clients, Newsreader
Platform: Windows
License: Proprietary
Interface: GUI
Programing language:
First release: 1994
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Forté Agent – an email and Usenet news client developed by Mark Sidell and the team at Forté Internet Software in 1994. Originally called Forte Advanced Management Systems, Forté Internet Software, produced in the 1980s and 1990s enterprise-level products including network optimization and station administration tools that were licensed by Nortel Networks. In 1996, Forté created Adante, software for managing high volumes of inbound corporate email.

Features:
– MegaJoin for Usenet and NZB Binaries – Agent provides a better user experience by joining related Usenet headers into a single “Mega” message that can reduce the number of messages in a binary newsgroup by a factor of 100. MegaJoin is a proprietary pattern-matching technology developed for Agent and does not require any additional 3rd party software.
– Automatic Joining of RAR and Split Binaries – Agent will automatically download and join archived RAR or Split files. Now you can watch or listen to media files without any hassles.
– Automatic Repair of Damaged Binaries – Agent will automatically download only the PAR files needed to repair a damaged file. You don’t have to do a thing because Agent does it all for you.
– Text Newsgroups – Provides a rich set of commands for search, navigation, and filtering for text newsgroups.
– Multiple Email Accounts – Collects email from multiple POP accounts, sends via multiple SMTP servers.
– Safe Internet Email – Send and receive email seamlessly from multiple POP accounts and SMTP servers while avoiding viruses and trojans.
– Safe HTML Messages – Render HTML on your terms and only download images from contacts you trust.
– Multiple News Servers – Agent can get headers and bodies independently from different servers. If one server becomes unavailable Agent will automatically switche to a different server.
– Virtual News Servers – Agent will automatically combine content from multiple servers to fill in missing messages.
– Optimized Downloads – Agent automatically utilizes the maximum number of connections available on all your news servers while Agent’s Task Manager prioritizes header and body downloads in parallel.
– Video File Previews – Agent enables you to download and preview a small sample of a RAR archive to ensure you are downloading the content you expect. After previewing the video, you can download the remaining files with a single click.
– Password Detection and Notification – Agent samples each media file to determine if a password is necessary to extract the content. If a media file requires a password then Agent prompts you to decide how to proceed. You can instruct Agent to always to cancel password-protected RAR downloads to avoid scams and other malicious content.
– Picture Preview – Agent allows you to preview binary images while you download so you can quickly and easily sample newsgroups to ensure you get the content you expect. Watch the Binary Pictures tutorial to learn more.
– Saving Attachments – Agent gives you complete control over how and where to save binary files on you computer. Watch the Binary Attachments tutorial to learn more.

The appliacation can be try within 30 days trial.

Nettalk

Nettalk

Web site: ntalk.de/Nettalk/en/
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: Windows
License: Apache
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Visual Basic
First release:
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Nettalk – a powerful but easy to use free (open source) IRC-client for Windows. In contrast to many other IRC clients, as Nettalk’s user interface is based on Windows standards, it allows inexperienced users to quickly learn it and become comfortable with IRC.

The smart user interface is based on Windows standards, so it is easy to get used to it. The following languages for the interface are available: English, Spanish, Dutch, Russian, Chinese, Hungarian and German.

One of the features of Nettalk includes the ability to hold the configuration of servers separately (or even multiple connections to the same server), and to maintain aspects of these automatically. These include Nick Serv-identifications and the channels which were in use when last disconnected. By automatically tracking these for you, when you next connect your identity and preferred channels are automatically restored.

Nettalk has many features including alerts when your nick is mentioned, the generation of HTML pages so that you can keep conversations for later, full logging, the support for DCC, multiple colours, watched friend lists, full screen private messaging, whispering and for advanced users a Visual Basic like scripting language.

Features:
– Comfortable management of many IRC-connections
– Automatic command completion
– Automatic syntax completion
– Automatic nick completion
– Text de/encryption
– Spelling check
– Script support (with Basic-syntax)
– Plug-in support
– On Screen displaying of messages (e.g. in games)
– Displaying of messages during working in Windows.
– Automatic storing of connections and there properties including opened channels
– DCC chat und file trasfer
– Unicode by using UTF-8 for chans, nicks and text
– Sock proxy support
– Easy configurable text and menu shortcuts
– Configurable colors and background image
– And much more…

The project founder is Nicolas Kruse.

Monochrome

Monochrome

Web site: perkele.cc/software/monochrome
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C#
First release:
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Monochrome – an IRC client intended for long-time IRC users. Its primary goals are security, reliability and stability despite IRC network failures or connectivity problems.

Features:
– Reliable automatic identification with NickServ on most popular IRC networks.
– Full Unicode support.
– Sending and receiving of DCC file transfers, with auto-accept whitelist.
– Ignore and half-ignore lists.
– Trigger word list.
– Auto-away, monitoring of away state of other users.
– Logging.
– Customizable command aliases.
– Variety of entertaining easter eggs.

The project founder is Peter Pawlowski.

mIRC

mIRC

Web site: mirc.com
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: Windows
License: Proprietary, Trialware
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C, C++
First release: February 28, 1995
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mIRC – a full featured Internet Relay Chat client for Windows that can be used to communicate, share, play or work with others on IRC networks around the world, either in multi-user group conferences or in one-to-one private discussions.

It has a clean, practical interface that is highly configurable and supports features such as buddy lists, file transfers, multi-server connections, IPv6, SSL encryption, proxy support, UTF-8 display, UPnP, customizable sounds, spoken messages, tray notifications, message logging, and more.

mIRC also has a powerful scripting language that can be used both to automate mIRC and to create applications that perform a wide range of functions from network communications to playing games.

The project founder is Khaled Mardam-Bey.

LeafChat

LeafChat

Web site: leafdigital.com/software/leafchat/
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: Linux, OS X, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Java
First release: 2005
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LeafChat – an IRC client for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux. Chat with your friends using popular IRC networks. LeafChat has a friendly, clean interface that doesn’t get in the way of your conversations. Connect to multiple servers at once on the same screen, so that it’s easy to keep up with all your friends. LeafChat is open source.

You can add features to LeafChat by installing ‘plug-ins’, which are pieces of Java software that run inside LeafChat.

Features:
– Connect to most standard servers – and, if your friends are in different places, connect to two, three or more at the same time.
– Chat in channels, in message windows, or through direct connection. Send files to others through DCC.
– Automatically log all conversations or just some. Set logs to be deleted after a few weeks, or never. View logs through a simple interface and export them to HTML for your web page.
– Create more complex functionality with built-in scripting based on Java™.

The project developer is Samuel Marshall.

KiwiIRC

KiwiIRC

Web site: kiwiirc.com
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: BSD, Linux, OS X, Windows
License: Apache 2.0
Interface: Web interface
Programing language: JavaScript, Node.js
First release: 2016
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KiwiIRC – a web based, open source IRC client software, which works in a modern web browsers.

Features:
– 100% static files. Host with your favourite web server or a CDN
– For single networks, bouncer hosts, or a personal generic IRC client that remembers your networks
– Works out of the box with a default IRC network – or use your own
– Single or multiple IRC network connections
– Multiple layouts for small areas or full page layouts
– Light and dark modes
– Desktop notifications
– Extremely versatile via a single JSON config file at runtime
– Themable and rich plugin support such as file uploading and video calling
– Team mode for workplaces
– Directly to a websocket IRC server
– Connect via the webircgateway websocket proxy for normal IRC servers
– Stay connected with KiwiBNC

Website Widgets – Embed an IRC client widget into your website for an instant, free live chat. The web widget gives you access to a large number of supported networks without any in-depth setting up. No downloads or plugins required meaning your users can start engaging in your community easily.

Instantbird

Instantbird

Web site: instantbird.com
Category: Network
Subcategory: IM, IRC clients
Platform: Linux, OS X, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C, JavaScript
First release: October 18, 2007
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Instantbird – an instant messaging client with support for AOL, Yahoo, MSN, Google Talk, Twitter, Facebook, XMPP, IRC and ICQ. It supports for customization using themes and extensions built-in. Instantbird is built on the same technical platform as Firefox.

As of October 2017 development of Instantbird as a standalone product has been stopped.

IceChat

IceChat

Web site: icechat.net
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: C#
First release: April 8, 2002
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IceChat – an IRC (Internet Relay Chat) client that can be used in 64bit versions of Windows 7/8/8.1 and Windows 10.

IceChat is a very user friendly program that can be setup in a matter of minutes. IceChat is capable of connecting to multiple servers and channels all at once, with ease, so you can easily chat with your friends in your favorite channels.

IceChat has some unique features that set it apart from other similar programs. Most users truly enjoy the built in Emoticons. The Favorite Server Tree is truly fantastic, and because IceChat is built around its multi-server capabilities, it is an essential part of IceChat that makes it that much easier to use.

IceChat started in development in 2000, and has gone through many changes in its interface, design, and of course its many features.
IceChat is FreeWare, meaning anyone can use it, at no cost. IceChat 9 is open sourced, written in C#, and available at Github.

The main IceChat Support channel is located on Quakenet (irc.quakenet.org) in the #icechat channel. The IceChat 9 Support/Developer channel is located on Freenode in the #icechat channel.

The project founder is Paul Vanderzee.

ERC

Emacs

Web site: gnu.org/software/emacs/erc.html
Category: Network
Subcategory: IRC clients
Platform: BSD, DOS, Linux, OS X, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: TUI
Programing language: C, Emacs Lisp
First release:
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ERC – a powerful, modular, and extensible Internet Relay Chat client distributed with GNU Emacs since version 22.1.

ERC provides all the features that users expect from an IRC client:
– multi channels / multi servers: every channel is put in a separate buffer; several IRC servers may be used at the same time.
– queries: private conversations are treated as channels, and are put into private buffers.
– highlighting: some occurences of words can be highlighted, thus easing conversation tracking (ErcHighlighting)
– notification: ERC can notify you that users are online (ErcNotify)
– channel tracking: channels can be hidden and conversation continue in the background. You are notified when something is said in such a hidden channel. (ErcChannelTracking)
– nick completion: ERC can complete words so as to ease the writing of nicknames. (ErcCompletion)
– history: past actions are kept in history rings for future use. (ErcHistory)
– multi languages: messages are multilingual and can be customized. (ErcCatalog)
– user scripting: users can load scripts (e.g. auto greeting scripts) at ERC startup.

ERC works with both GNU Emacs and XEmacs; it also uses optional features specific to each flavour. It can also use some Emacs modules, such as the BBDB (Big Brother Database).

ERC was originally written by Alexander L. Belikoff and Sergey Berezin. They stopped development around December 1999. Their last released version was ERC 2.0.

In June 2001, Mario Lang and Alex Schroeder took over development and created a ERC Project at https://sourceforge.net/projects/erc.

In reaction to a mail about the new ERC development effort, Sergey Berezin said, “First of all, I’m glad that my version of ERC is being used out there. The thing is, I do not have free time and enough incentive anymore to work on ERC, so I would be happy if you guys take over the project entirely.”

Since about 2009, ERC is no longer developed as a separate project, but is maintained as part of Emacs.

OnionShare

OnionShare

Web site: onionshare.org
Category: Network
Subcategory: Peer2Peer Clients, IM
Platform: Linux, OS X, Windows
License: GPL
Interface: GUI
Programing language: Python
First release: 2014
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OnionShare – an open source tool that lets you securely and anonymously share files, host websites, and chat with friends using the Tor network.

Third parties don’t have access to anything that happens in OnionShare. Using OnionShare means hosting services directly on your computer. When sharing files with OnionShare, they are not uploaded to any server. If you make an OnionShare chat room, your computer acts as a server for that too. This avoids the traditional model of having to trust the computers of others.

Network eavesdroppers can’t spy on anything that happens in OnionShare in transit. The connection between the Tor onion service and Tor Browser is end-to-end encrypted. This means network attackers can’t eavesdrop on anything except encrypted Tor traffic. Even if an eavesdropper is a malicious rendezvous node used to connect the Tor Browser with OnionShare’s onion service, the traffic is encrypted using the onion service’s private key.

Anonymity of OnionShare users are protected by Tor. OnionShare and Tor Browser protect the anonymity of the users. As long as the OnionShare user anonymously communicates the OnionShare address with the Tor Browser users, the Tor Browser users and eavesdroppers can’t learn the identity of the OnionShare user.

If an attacker learns about the onion service, it still can’t access anything. Prior attacks against the Tor network to enumerate onion services allowed the attacker to discover private .onion addresses. If an attack discovers a private OnionShare address, a password will be prevent them from accessing it (unless the OnionShare user chooses to turn it off and make it public). The password is generated by choosing two random words from a list of 6800 words, making 6800², or about 46 million possible passwords. Only 20 wrong guesses can be made before OnionShare stops the server, preventing brute force attacks against the password.

Communicating the OnionShare address might not be secure. Communicating the OnionShare address to people is the responsibility of the OnionShare user. If sent insecurely (such as through an email message monitored by an attacker), an eavesdropper can tell that OnionShare is being used. If the eavesdropper loads the address in Tor Browser while the service is still up, they can access it. To avoid this, the address must be communicated securely, via encrypted text message (probably with disappearing messages enabled), encrypted email, or in person. This isn’t necessary when using OnionShare for something that isn’t secret.

Communicating the OnionShare address might not be anonymous. Extra precautions must be taken to ensure the OnionShare address is communicated anonymously. A new email or chat account, only accessed over Tor, can be used to share the address. This isn’t necessary unless anonymity is a goal.